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20 blogs
  • 12 Mar 2017
    New York Times — Weekend trips to cities like Boston, Chicago or San Francisco rarely require a rental car to get around, given their extensive public transportation systems. But more unexpected locales are joining the car-optional list as new and expanding rapid transit options take root across the country. “It’s interesting to see how the West in particular is growing and expanding public transportation,” said Virginia Miller, a spokeswoman for the American Public Transportation Association. Detroit The Motor City once had a vital streetcar system, including a track that ran down its main corridor, Woodward Avenue. In April, some 60 years after the old lines were eradicated to make way for cars, the new QLine will restore streetcar service to downtown over a 3.3-mile route. "You can't underestimate the symbolic importance of unveiling mass transit in a city like Detroit, which was built on cars," said Amy S. Eckert, a freelance writer and the author of "100 Things to Do in Detroit Before You Die." The streetcar, of course, is limited relative to the footprint of Detroit, and taxis or shuttles, including a service called Skoot that offers van transportation for $20 a person, are still the most common way to get downtown from the airport. But the project has sparked a building boom as residences, restaurants and shops have moved in along the corridor. Visitors will be able to shuttle along the route for about $1.50 a ride from near the Detroit River downtown to the nearby baseball and football stadiums (professional hockey and basketball facilities are being built and are expected to open this fall). The route also passes through the cultural Midtown district, home to the Detroit Institute of Arts and other museums. Hotels along the streetcar route include the recently opened Aloft Detroit at the David Whitney. "Come April, I don’t think you’ll miss having a car, provided you stay in and around Woodward Avenue, and that’s where most of the renaissance is anyway," Ms. Eckert said. Some areas worth exploring, like the vibrant Corktown neighborhood or Belle Isle Park, are some distance from the streetcar route. For those, there are Uber, Lyft and, also coming in spring, Detroit Bike Share with 43 stations. Read Full Article @ The New York Times
    67 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • New York Times — Weekend trips to cities like Boston, Chicago or San Francisco rarely require a rental car to get around, given their extensive public transportation systems. But more unexpected locales are joining the car-optional list as new and expanding rapid transit options take root across the country. “It’s interesting to see how the West in particular is growing and expanding public transportation,” said Virginia Miller, a spokeswoman for the American Public Transportation Association. Detroit The Motor City once had a vital streetcar system, including a track that ran down its main corridor, Woodward Avenue. In April, some 60 years after the old lines were eradicated to make way for cars, the new QLine will restore streetcar service to downtown over a 3.3-mile route. "You can't underestimate the symbolic importance of unveiling mass transit in a city like Detroit, which was built on cars," said Amy S. Eckert, a freelance writer and the author of "100 Things to Do in Detroit Before You Die." The streetcar, of course, is limited relative to the footprint of Detroit, and taxis or shuttles, including a service called Skoot that offers van transportation for $20 a person, are still the most common way to get downtown from the airport. But the project has sparked a building boom as residences, restaurants and shops have moved in along the corridor. Visitors will be able to shuttle along the route for about $1.50 a ride from near the Detroit River downtown to the nearby baseball and football stadiums (professional hockey and basketball facilities are being built and are expected to open this fall). The route also passes through the cultural Midtown district, home to the Detroit Institute of Arts and other museums. Hotels along the streetcar route include the recently opened Aloft Detroit at the David Whitney. "Come April, I don’t think you’ll miss having a car, provided you stay in and around Woodward Avenue, and that’s where most of the renaissance is anyway," Ms. Eckert said. Some areas worth exploring, like the vibrant Corktown neighborhood or Belle Isle Park, are some distance from the streetcar route. For those, there are Uber, Lyft and, also coming in spring, Detroit Bike Share with 43 stations. Read Full Article @ The New York Times
    Mar 12, 2017 67
  • 08 Mar 2017
    SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    74 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    Mar 08, 2017 74
  • 07 Mar 2017
    A new plan by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy calls for the creation of two new pathways to the river similar to the Dequindre Cut. The project plans to expand the decade long transformation of the riverfront district from an industrial sector to public, recreational-use center, which will spur new people-friendly developments in the district. The framework plan also envisions added preservation of about 8 acres of land for public use, particularly from Atwater Street south to the river, and Stroh River Place and Rivard Plaza; an eastward expansion of the Detroit RiverWalk; safety improvements along East Jefferson Avenue. The Joseph Campau Greenway plans to run from East Vernor Highway south to the river, while the Beltline Greenway, between Belleview and Beaufait streets, runs from Kercheval Street to the river. Mark Wallace, president and CEO of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, said that the construction on the nearly 2-mile Joseph Campau Greenway is expected to begin next year, while the 1.5-mile Beltline Greenway should begin construction toward the end of this year or early into next year. Three sites previously expected to be privately developed are now planned for public use. The property was previously planned as a site for former mayor Dave Bing's  $60 million Watermark residential development. A groundbreaking is expected this year on the promenade linking the Detroit RiverWalk from Mt. Elliott Park to the Douglas MacArthur Bridge running along the Uniroyal Tire Co. site. In addition to the new pathways, things like improved crosswalks and new bike lanes are expected as part of the plan. The overall improvement program is expected to be jointly funded by the conservancy of Detroit and the Economic Development Corp. The total cost of the improvements was not available. Source: Crains Detroit
    144 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • A new plan by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy calls for the creation of two new pathways to the river similar to the Dequindre Cut. The project plans to expand the decade long transformation of the riverfront district from an industrial sector to public, recreational-use center, which will spur new people-friendly developments in the district. The framework plan also envisions added preservation of about 8 acres of land for public use, particularly from Atwater Street south to the river, and Stroh River Place and Rivard Plaza; an eastward expansion of the Detroit RiverWalk; safety improvements along East Jefferson Avenue. The Joseph Campau Greenway plans to run from East Vernor Highway south to the river, while the Beltline Greenway, between Belleview and Beaufait streets, runs from Kercheval Street to the river. Mark Wallace, president and CEO of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, said that the construction on the nearly 2-mile Joseph Campau Greenway is expected to begin next year, while the 1.5-mile Beltline Greenway should begin construction toward the end of this year or early into next year. Three sites previously expected to be privately developed are now planned for public use. The property was previously planned as a site for former mayor Dave Bing's  $60 million Watermark residential development. A groundbreaking is expected this year on the promenade linking the Detroit RiverWalk from Mt. Elliott Park to the Douglas MacArthur Bridge running along the Uniroyal Tire Co. site. In addition to the new pathways, things like improved crosswalks and new bike lanes are expected as part of the plan. The overall improvement program is expected to be jointly funded by the conservancy of Detroit and the Economic Development Corp. The total cost of the improvements was not available. Source: Crains Detroit
    Mar 07, 2017 144
  • 04 Mar 2017
    The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) recently announced that pedestrian foot-paths and protected bike lanes will be included on the Gordie Howe International Bridge. The 12-foot-wide path will be on the east side of the bridge with concrete barriers separating pedestrians and cyclists from motorists, the lanes will accommodate two-way traffic for pedestrians and cyclists, and the routes will connect to local throughfares. "Today's announcement is an example of how WDBA responds to opportunities our communities bring to our attention," said Dwight Duncan, chair of the bridge authority. "We have heard you loud and clear that the ability to cross the Gordie Howe International Bridge by bike or by foot is important to you. They say that a vision needs a plan, otherwise it's a dream and I am pleased to say that dreams do come true. The integration of a multi-use path will benefit the communities, as it will support active transportation, a healthy lifestyle as well as enhance cycle tourism across the border." Canada plans to cover the cost of the $2.1 billion bridge, plus a $250 million customs plaza on the U.S. side. Michigan's share of the cost is to be repaid in the form of toll collections. No word on toll prices or restrictions for cyclists and pedestrians.  (Source MLive.com)
    90 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) recently announced that pedestrian foot-paths and protected bike lanes will be included on the Gordie Howe International Bridge. The 12-foot-wide path will be on the east side of the bridge with concrete barriers separating pedestrians and cyclists from motorists, the lanes will accommodate two-way traffic for pedestrians and cyclists, and the routes will connect to local throughfares. "Today's announcement is an example of how WDBA responds to opportunities our communities bring to our attention," said Dwight Duncan, chair of the bridge authority. "We have heard you loud and clear that the ability to cross the Gordie Howe International Bridge by bike or by foot is important to you. They say that a vision needs a plan, otherwise it's a dream and I am pleased to say that dreams do come true. The integration of a multi-use path will benefit the communities, as it will support active transportation, a healthy lifestyle as well as enhance cycle tourism across the border." Canada plans to cover the cost of the $2.1 billion bridge, plus a $250 million customs plaza on the U.S. side. Michigan's share of the cost is to be repaid in the form of toll collections. No word on toll prices or restrictions for cyclists and pedestrians.  (Source MLive.com)
    Mar 04, 2017 90
  • 25 Jan 2017
    This past Tuesday the city of Detroit held a ground breaking ceremony at Tolan Feild for a $4-million dollar multi-sport velodrome complex. Construction of the facility will begin this spring. It is projected to be completed sometime this summer. The project is currently being funded by The Detroit Fitness Foundation(DFF). In addition to the indoor velodrome, the DFF is donating $125,000 for additional outdoor improvements, like a small skate park, a practice soccer field. The city has also committed a cool $250,000 for some improved outdoor features including playground equipment, a picnic shelter, tables, fitness station and horseshoe pits. The city's mayor, Mike Duggan said "Having safe and healthy spaces within our neighborhoods for families to live and play is essential to our city's continued growth. The Detroit Fitness Foundation initiative will be a great asset to our community and its residents." The velodrome was designed by Dale Hughes a resident of Rochester Hills. Dale has designed and built more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta and the 2015 Pan Am Games Velodrome in Toronto. Hughes is the executive director of the DFF and the owner of V-Worldwide, a construction company specializing in velodrome construction. "Our goal is to provide kids with opportunities to turn the Olympic dream into a reality," Hughes said. "I've had the honor of working on projects around the world but I am thrilled to bring this state-of-the-art indoor complex to my back yard in the city of Detroit!" DFF is seeking a naming rights sponsor and offering additional sponsorship opportunities for the complex. More to come soon!
    119 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • This past Tuesday the city of Detroit held a ground breaking ceremony at Tolan Feild for a $4-million dollar multi-sport velodrome complex. Construction of the facility will begin this spring. It is projected to be completed sometime this summer. The project is currently being funded by The Detroit Fitness Foundation(DFF). In addition to the indoor velodrome, the DFF is donating $125,000 for additional outdoor improvements, like a small skate park, a practice soccer field. The city has also committed a cool $250,000 for some improved outdoor features including playground equipment, a picnic shelter, tables, fitness station and horseshoe pits. The city's mayor, Mike Duggan said "Having safe and healthy spaces within our neighborhoods for families to live and play is essential to our city's continued growth. The Detroit Fitness Foundation initiative will be a great asset to our community and its residents." The velodrome was designed by Dale Hughes a resident of Rochester Hills. Dale has designed and built more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta and the 2015 Pan Am Games Velodrome in Toronto. Hughes is the executive director of the DFF and the owner of V-Worldwide, a construction company specializing in velodrome construction. "Our goal is to provide kids with opportunities to turn the Olympic dream into a reality," Hughes said. "I've had the honor of working on projects around the world but I am thrilled to bring this state-of-the-art indoor complex to my back yard in the city of Detroit!" DFF is seeking a naming rights sponsor and offering additional sponsorship opportunities for the complex. More to come soon!
    Jan 25, 2017 119
  • 05 Oct 2016
    Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    279 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    Oct 05, 2016 279
  • 03 Aug 2016
    Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    188 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    Aug 03, 2016 188
  • 24 May 2016
    Detroit Bike City.com is now online. The site is designed so that local cyclists can stay connected with one another.The site is designed to bring local cyclists together so that local cyclists can more easily collaborate locally. The site gives members the ability to find one another easily by location, ride style, interests or whatever. The site also is setup with a cool calender and a wiki that enables locals to find rides, events and detailed information.One of the main features of the site are the blogs. The blogs are setup to allow specific members the ability to share stories and start conversations about events or specific interests. The site is currently in development. There are many changes and additions that need to be made. With your help we can move this project along at a quicker pace. If you would like to be involved with the project please contact the site's Aaron Lad or the site's administrator. Thanks!
    159 Posted by Systems Admin
  • Detroit Bike City.com is now online. The site is designed so that local cyclists can stay connected with one another.The site is designed to bring local cyclists together so that local cyclists can more easily collaborate locally. The site gives members the ability to find one another easily by location, ride style, interests or whatever. The site also is setup with a cool calender and a wiki that enables locals to find rides, events and detailed information.One of the main features of the site are the blogs. The blogs are setup to allow specific members the ability to share stories and start conversations about events or specific interests. The site is currently in development. There are many changes and additions that need to be made. With your help we can move this project along at a quicker pace. If you would like to be involved with the project please contact the site's Aaron Lad or the site's administrator. Thanks!
    May 24, 2016 159
  • 13 Apr 2016
    The city of Birmingham recently put the final touches on it's recreational bike route. You can view the route here. The project is a part of a recommendation from Birmingham's Multi-Modal Transportation Plan which was created in 2013 to redesign public roads so that Birmingham's urban corridors are safely accessible to cyclists. View the plan here. City Engineer Paul O’Meara said the goal is to have the neighborhood connector route up and running this summer. “We have a master plan and this is one of the best representative examples that we’re trying to welcome other modes of transportation,” O’Meara said. The route is approximately 6-miles long it uses existing streets, with two exceptions along Oak Street and North Eton Avenue where a half-mile long bike-lane has been installed. Otherwise, the system currently relies on surface-street welfare with a series of directional signs and pavement marking.    
    56 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The city of Birmingham recently put the final touches on it's recreational bike route. You can view the route here. The project is a part of a recommendation from Birmingham's Multi-Modal Transportation Plan which was created in 2013 to redesign public roads so that Birmingham's urban corridors are safely accessible to cyclists. View the plan here. City Engineer Paul O’Meara said the goal is to have the neighborhood connector route up and running this summer. “We have a master plan and this is one of the best representative examples that we’re trying to welcome other modes of transportation,” O’Meara said. The route is approximately 6-miles long it uses existing streets, with two exceptions along Oak Street and North Eton Avenue where a half-mile long bike-lane has been installed. Otherwise, the system currently relies on surface-street welfare with a series of directional signs and pavement marking.    
    Apr 13, 2016 56
  • 03 Apr 2016
    The city of Ferndale, in collaboration with five other communities, was awarded $200,000 from the 2016 Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) this with the aims at creating the Woodward Corridor Neighborhood Bicycle Network the will connect six cities. The TAP grant was penned by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The grant is for a bike path network that connects Ferndale, Hazel Park, Huntington Woods, Oak Park, Pleasant Ridge and Royal Oak. City Planner Justin Lyons said the purpose of the network is to connect the communities as well as provide easier transportation via bicycle, which fits in with the city’s goal of opening up the use of multiple modes of transportation. “Our purpose was quality of life and safety and helping residents and businesses in Ferndale and the surrounding corridor,” Lyons said. “People can get from downtown Hazel Park to Oak Park in a connected route, and we have seen projects like this spur further interests in development, like Livernois, where businesses are moving in because the city is making improvements there.” The 17-mile loop includes central main business districts, 13 parks, 10 schools, two libraries and one university.
    35 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The city of Ferndale, in collaboration with five other communities, was awarded $200,000 from the 2016 Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) this with the aims at creating the Woodward Corridor Neighborhood Bicycle Network the will connect six cities. The TAP grant was penned by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The grant is for a bike path network that connects Ferndale, Hazel Park, Huntington Woods, Oak Park, Pleasant Ridge and Royal Oak. City Planner Justin Lyons said the purpose of the network is to connect the communities as well as provide easier transportation via bicycle, which fits in with the city’s goal of opening up the use of multiple modes of transportation. “Our purpose was quality of life and safety and helping residents and businesses in Ferndale and the surrounding corridor,” Lyons said. “People can get from downtown Hazel Park to Oak Park in a connected route, and we have seen projects like this spur further interests in development, like Livernois, where businesses are moving in because the city is making improvements there.” The 17-mile loop includes central main business districts, 13 parks, 10 schools, two libraries and one university.
    Apr 03, 2016 35