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18 blogs
  • 15 Mar 2018
    Federal funds will help pay for a 6-mile, multi-use loop trail around Belle Isle Park in Detroit. U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters of Michigan say $750,000 is being provided by the National Park Service's Land and Water Conservation Fund State and Local Assistance Program. The program provides grants for local and state park projects outside national park boundaries. Private investments will match the federal funding for the Belle Isle trail. In 2016, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources said it would develop a master plan for Belle Isle's trail system that includes a trail around its perimeter and a Detroit trailhead for the Iron Belle Trail. Belle Isle is a 987-acre park in the Detroit River that features a nature zoo, conservatory, golf driving range, maritime museum and other attractions. Source: CrainsDertoit.com
    64 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • Federal funds will help pay for a 6-mile, multi-use loop trail around Belle Isle Park in Detroit. U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters of Michigan say $750,000 is being provided by the National Park Service's Land and Water Conservation Fund State and Local Assistance Program. The program provides grants for local and state park projects outside national park boundaries. Private investments will match the federal funding for the Belle Isle trail. In 2016, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources said it would develop a master plan for Belle Isle's trail system that includes a trail around its perimeter and a Detroit trailhead for the Iron Belle Trail. Belle Isle is a 987-acre park in the Detroit River that features a nature zoo, conservatory, golf driving range, maritime museum and other attractions. Source: CrainsDertoit.com
    Mar 15, 2018 64
  • 25 Feb 2018
    OAKLAND COUNTY — A bike sharing program could be coming to seven local communities in 2019 or beyond. The cities of Berkley, Royal Oak, Pleasant Ridge, Ferndale, Madison Heights, Huntington Woods and Detroit have been talking about participating in a bike sharing program called MoGo. The program already runs in Detroit. Recently, the Huntington Woods City Commission approved at its Feb. 13 meeting a letter of support for a Transportation Alternatives Program, or TAP, grant application that Ferndale is looking into applying for by the grant’s March 7 deadline. If the grant is awarded, it will be given to the program for a potential 2019 launch. “The City Commission is interested in continuing to study it,” City Manager Amy Sullivan said. “We have not made a decision one way or the other whether it is something that would be needed in Huntington Woods. So we’re just continuing to take a look at the program, take a look at the costs, eventually get feedback from residents on their thoughts on the program, and then a decision will be made.” Sullivan said the two things the city and  the commission want to learn more about are the costs and the interest among residents to have this service available in Huntington Woods. “In other words, the old ‘if you build it, will they come’ philosophy,” she said. “I’m not sure yet whether residents will take advantage of the bike sharing program.” The MoGo program has a person buy a pass online, on an app or at a bike station. A person can then take a bike from a station and return it when the rental time ends. There are three different stations a city can select: a kiosk station that has a payment station, 15 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $34,456; a smart station that has 16 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $27,631; and a satellite station that has a kiosk tech panel, seven docking points and three bikes, which would cost $14,431. The operating costs are a monthly fee of $89 per docking point. Sullivan said the one-time costs of the stations would be offset by the TAP grant, which would cover 70 percent of that total. The city would have to pay the rest or seek funding from another source. “It is the operational cost; the monthly cost that would not be offset by the TAP grant would have to be covered by user fees or sponsorships,” she said. Ferndale has been leading the charge for the program behind the scenes in looking at applying for the grant, though City Planner Justin Lyons said there isn’t much he can share at this point. “Bike sharing’s been a priority for City Council throughout a few plans — a strategic plan, (the) Ferndale Moves! plan,” he said. “We’re always looking at new ways to get people to and from where they want to go. So we’ve started looking at a program, but at this point it’s kind of too early to share much. We’re exploring what it would cost and what grant opportunities there are right now.” If the program goes forward, Lyons believes Ferndale would probably want a bigger station, but he stressed that it’s still too early to tell if anything will happen. He said that the city should know more by the summer, when the grants will be awarded. In terms of asking cities including Huntington Woods to state their interest, Lyons said the Southeast Michigan Council of Goverments, which handles the TAP grant program with the Michigan Department of Transportation, awards points for a variety of reasons, and it is always supportive of regional partnerships.  “Anytime we apply for a TAP grant, like we did for the neighborhood bike route a few years ago with Oak Park for their improvements at Nine Mile last year, we always look to partner, and we’re always interested in partnering with neighboring communities, because really when you talk about bicycling improvements, if you can only bike around one city, it doesn’t really do the network justice. It’s really more of a ‘let’s try and improve the regional network as a whole,’” he said. Source: CandGnews.com/news
    103 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • OAKLAND COUNTY — A bike sharing program could be coming to seven local communities in 2019 or beyond. The cities of Berkley, Royal Oak, Pleasant Ridge, Ferndale, Madison Heights, Huntington Woods and Detroit have been talking about participating in a bike sharing program called MoGo. The program already runs in Detroit. Recently, the Huntington Woods City Commission approved at its Feb. 13 meeting a letter of support for a Transportation Alternatives Program, or TAP, grant application that Ferndale is looking into applying for by the grant’s March 7 deadline. If the grant is awarded, it will be given to the program for a potential 2019 launch. “The City Commission is interested in continuing to study it,” City Manager Amy Sullivan said. “We have not made a decision one way or the other whether it is something that would be needed in Huntington Woods. So we’re just continuing to take a look at the program, take a look at the costs, eventually get feedback from residents on their thoughts on the program, and then a decision will be made.” Sullivan said the two things the city and  the commission want to learn more about are the costs and the interest among residents to have this service available in Huntington Woods. “In other words, the old ‘if you build it, will they come’ philosophy,” she said. “I’m not sure yet whether residents will take advantage of the bike sharing program.” The MoGo program has a person buy a pass online, on an app or at a bike station. A person can then take a bike from a station and return it when the rental time ends. There are three different stations a city can select: a kiosk station that has a payment station, 15 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $34,456; a smart station that has 16 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $27,631; and a satellite station that has a kiosk tech panel, seven docking points and three bikes, which would cost $14,431. The operating costs are a monthly fee of $89 per docking point. Sullivan said the one-time costs of the stations would be offset by the TAP grant, which would cover 70 percent of that total. The city would have to pay the rest or seek funding from another source. “It is the operational cost; the monthly cost that would not be offset by the TAP grant would have to be covered by user fees or sponsorships,” she said. Ferndale has been leading the charge for the program behind the scenes in looking at applying for the grant, though City Planner Justin Lyons said there isn’t much he can share at this point. “Bike sharing’s been a priority for City Council throughout a few plans — a strategic plan, (the) Ferndale Moves! plan,” he said. “We’re always looking at new ways to get people to and from where they want to go. So we’ve started looking at a program, but at this point it’s kind of too early to share much. We’re exploring what it would cost and what grant opportunities there are right now.” If the program goes forward, Lyons believes Ferndale would probably want a bigger station, but he stressed that it’s still too early to tell if anything will happen. He said that the city should know more by the summer, when the grants will be awarded. In terms of asking cities including Huntington Woods to state their interest, Lyons said the Southeast Michigan Council of Goverments, which handles the TAP grant program with the Michigan Department of Transportation, awards points for a variety of reasons, and it is always supportive of regional partnerships.  “Anytime we apply for a TAP grant, like we did for the neighborhood bike route a few years ago with Oak Park for their improvements at Nine Mile last year, we always look to partner, and we’re always interested in partnering with neighboring communities, because really when you talk about bicycling improvements, if you can only bike around one city, it doesn’t really do the network justice. It’s really more of a ‘let’s try and improve the regional network as a whole,’” he said. Source: CandGnews.com/news
    Feb 25, 2018 103
  • 11 Oct 2017
    StreetFilms.org, Clarence Eckerson Jr. ― More than 300 volunteers organized by Transportation Alternatives formed a six-block-long “human-protected bike lane” on Fifth Avenue last night, calling on the de Blasio administration to extend the protected bike lane network through Midtown’s busiest streets. Fifth Avenue has no bike infrastructure above 26th Street, leaving a large void in the bicycle network where there’s huge travel demand. Protected bike lanes can’t come soon enough: Through the first eight months of this year drivers injured 15 people biking and 28 people walking on Fifth Avenue in Midtown, according to city data. Last month, DOT presented a plan to add a second bus lane on this part of Fifth Avenue, but a bikeway was not included. To date, the agency has hesitated to claim street space for biking and walking on these busy Midtown avenues. DOT has stated a vague intention to extend protected bike lanes through the busiest blocks of Fifth and Sixth Avenues but never backed that up with specific commitments, timetables, or designs. The hundreds of people taking action yesterday were saying that’s not good enough and took matters into their own hands. The human-protected bike lane occupied two lanes, from 50th Street to 44th Street. Fifth Avenue functioned perfectly well while the impromptu bike lane was in effect. People biking quickly gravitated to the new space set aside for them, while car and bus traffic continued apace in the remaining three lanes. In a written response posted on DOT’s Twitter feed, Commissioner Polly Trottenberg framed the campaign for a bike lane as being in conflict with the second bus lane for Fifth Avenue. “We did not want to postpone what we see as a reasonably straightforward improvement for buses,” she wrote.
    157 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • StreetFilms.org, Clarence Eckerson Jr. ― More than 300 volunteers organized by Transportation Alternatives formed a six-block-long “human-protected bike lane” on Fifth Avenue last night, calling on the de Blasio administration to extend the protected bike lane network through Midtown’s busiest streets. Fifth Avenue has no bike infrastructure above 26th Street, leaving a large void in the bicycle network where there’s huge travel demand. Protected bike lanes can’t come soon enough: Through the first eight months of this year drivers injured 15 people biking and 28 people walking on Fifth Avenue in Midtown, according to city data. Last month, DOT presented a plan to add a second bus lane on this part of Fifth Avenue, but a bikeway was not included. To date, the agency has hesitated to claim street space for biking and walking on these busy Midtown avenues. DOT has stated a vague intention to extend protected bike lanes through the busiest blocks of Fifth and Sixth Avenues but never backed that up with specific commitments, timetables, or designs. The hundreds of people taking action yesterday were saying that’s not good enough and took matters into their own hands. The human-protected bike lane occupied two lanes, from 50th Street to 44th Street. Fifth Avenue functioned perfectly well while the impromptu bike lane was in effect. People biking quickly gravitated to the new space set aside for them, while car and bus traffic continued apace in the remaining three lanes. In a written response posted on DOT’s Twitter feed, Commissioner Polly Trottenberg framed the campaign for a bike lane as being in conflict with the second bus lane for Fifth Avenue. “We did not want to postpone what we see as a reasonably straightforward improvement for buses,” she wrote.
    Oct 11, 2017 157
  • 29 Oct 2017
    curbed.com — The Inner Circle Greenway has been in the works for years, and now, as the 26-mile non-motorized trail gets closer to reality, it has a new name. The trail will be named after Detroit boxing legend Joe Louis. This comes as we inch closer to the demolition of the Joe Louis Arena along the Riverfront. Planning, design, and construction of the trail will all be happening in the next few years. Courtesy of the City of Detroit & curbed.com The trail will connect many neighborhoods and communities in the city, from the East Riverfront up through Hamtramck, over to the University District, Ferndale, and Highland Park, and back down to Southwest Detroit. The planning of the trail has been a collaboration between the city, Detroit Greenways Coalition, the Kresge Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan. A request for proposals for framework consultants will be released in early 2018. According to a city press release, “The Framework Plan will include recommendations for land use and zoning, green infrastructure, connections to public assets such as parks, wayfinding, and thoughtful intersection with local and regional multimodal transportation routes such as the Iron Belle Trail, SMART bus network, and the new Gordie Howe Bridge.” The process will include community engagement throughout. Plans to honor Joe Louis could include murals and art installations along the route.
    184 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • curbed.com — The Inner Circle Greenway has been in the works for years, and now, as the 26-mile non-motorized trail gets closer to reality, it has a new name. The trail will be named after Detroit boxing legend Joe Louis. This comes as we inch closer to the demolition of the Joe Louis Arena along the Riverfront. Planning, design, and construction of the trail will all be happening in the next few years. Courtesy of the City of Detroit & curbed.com The trail will connect many neighborhoods and communities in the city, from the East Riverfront up through Hamtramck, over to the University District, Ferndale, and Highland Park, and back down to Southwest Detroit. The planning of the trail has been a collaboration between the city, Detroit Greenways Coalition, the Kresge Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan. A request for proposals for framework consultants will be released in early 2018. According to a city press release, “The Framework Plan will include recommendations for land use and zoning, green infrastructure, connections to public assets such as parks, wayfinding, and thoughtful intersection with local and regional multimodal transportation routes such as the Iron Belle Trail, SMART bus network, and the new Gordie Howe Bridge.” The process will include community engagement throughout. Plans to honor Joe Louis could include murals and art installations along the route.
    Oct 29, 2017 184
  • 09 Sep 2017
    Crains Detroit — Detroit is set to become home to only the second indoor cycling velodrome in the U.S. in December as part of a new multisport complex from the Detroit Fitness Foundation. A bright white air dome sprang up Wednesday at I-75 and Mack Avenue. The complex, first announced in January, will be part of the city's planned improvements to Tolan Playfield there. The $4 million complex, funded by non-profit DFF through an "angel" donor, is on track for a soft opening in December, said Dale Hughes, the foundation's executive director. It also has a 12-year agreement with the city of Detroit to provide it's programming. The facility features the air dome structure built by Hughes, who is also a velodrome developer. He has designed more than 20 velodromes worldwide, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta. Photo by Keith Stone The complex will include a 10th-of-a-mile-long cycling track; a concrete eighth-of-a-mile oval track for running, walking and inline skating; and a multipurpose infield for exercises classes, Hughes said. It will offer free access, equipment and programs for youth and seniors in the mornings and after school. The complex will include a cycling track, lanes for running, walking and skating, and a multipurpose infield. It will offer free access and programs for youth and seniors. The city and DFF committed $250,000 and $125,000 respectively to improve the park's environment with a playground, picnic space, a skateboard ramp and horseshoe pits. Read full article @ Crains Detroit
    133 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • Crains Detroit — Detroit is set to become home to only the second indoor cycling velodrome in the U.S. in December as part of a new multisport complex from the Detroit Fitness Foundation. A bright white air dome sprang up Wednesday at I-75 and Mack Avenue. The complex, first announced in January, will be part of the city's planned improvements to Tolan Playfield there. The $4 million complex, funded by non-profit DFF through an "angel" donor, is on track for a soft opening in December, said Dale Hughes, the foundation's executive director. It also has a 12-year agreement with the city of Detroit to provide it's programming. The facility features the air dome structure built by Hughes, who is also a velodrome developer. He has designed more than 20 velodromes worldwide, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta. Photo by Keith Stone The complex will include a 10th-of-a-mile-long cycling track; a concrete eighth-of-a-mile oval track for running, walking and inline skating; and a multipurpose infield for exercises classes, Hughes said. It will offer free access, equipment and programs for youth and seniors in the mornings and after school. The complex will include a cycling track, lanes for running, walking and skating, and a multipurpose infield. It will offer free access and programs for youth and seniors. The city and DFF committed $250,000 and $125,000 respectively to improve the park's environment with a playground, picnic space, a skateboard ramp and horseshoe pits. Read full article @ Crains Detroit
    Sep 09, 2017 133
  • 05 Oct 2017
    ROCHESTER — Second Annual “Cruisin’ for the Trails” Charity Ride Raises $2,500 for Friends of the Clinton River Trail Over 100 riders endured the near 90 degree temperature to participate in the second annual “Cruisin’ for the Trails” fall ride to benefit the Clinton River Trail. Hosted by Motor City Brew Tours, and sponsored by New Belgium Brewing Company, the event raised $2,500 to be used by the Friends of the Clinton River Trail for trail improvements. The route took riders about nine miles along the trail, from Clubhouse BFD in Rochester Hills to the Filmore 13 Brewery in downtown Pontiac, and then back. In addition to a t-shirt and bike related SWAG, adult riders were provided with lots of water, KIND snacks and selected New Belgium beverages. As part of the event festivities, New Belgium Brewing donated a custom designed bicycle for Friends of the Clinton River Trail (FCRT) to raffle at the end of the ride.Each year New Belgium contracts to have several unique designed bicycles built exclusively for them. The bikes are used to recognize employee milestones and for charitable causes. In this case the bike was hand-built by Detroit Bikes in their west-side Detroit factory. Sweet! Source: Rochester Media
    159 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • ROCHESTER — Second Annual “Cruisin’ for the Trails” Charity Ride Raises $2,500 for Friends of the Clinton River Trail Over 100 riders endured the near 90 degree temperature to participate in the second annual “Cruisin’ for the Trails” fall ride to benefit the Clinton River Trail. Hosted by Motor City Brew Tours, and sponsored by New Belgium Brewing Company, the event raised $2,500 to be used by the Friends of the Clinton River Trail for trail improvements. The route took riders about nine miles along the trail, from Clubhouse BFD in Rochester Hills to the Filmore 13 Brewery in downtown Pontiac, and then back. In addition to a t-shirt and bike related SWAG, adult riders were provided with lots of water, KIND snacks and selected New Belgium beverages. As part of the event festivities, New Belgium Brewing donated a custom designed bicycle for Friends of the Clinton River Trail (FCRT) to raffle at the end of the ride.Each year New Belgium contracts to have several unique designed bicycles built exclusively for them. The bikes are used to recognize employee milestones and for charitable causes. In this case the bike was hand-built by Detroit Bikes in their west-side Detroit factory. Sweet! Source: Rochester Media
    Oct 05, 2017 159
  • 26 Sep 2017
    ROYAL OAK, MI — A bike share system for Royal Oak could be in the works. City Commissioners directed staff to gather public input on the idea after a preliminary study found that programs have been successfully started in other nearby communities. “Dearborn residents and visitors have embraced our bike share program with enthusiasm,” said Mary Laundroche, a spokeswoman for the city. “In the first two months of operation, the number of rides surpassed expectations, and the bikes just keep getting used more and more in our downtown areas and beyond. It’s been especially appealing to Millenials.” The MoGo bike share in the greater downtown Detroit area has 430 bikes at 43 stations and started up in May. In Port Huron four bike share stations with 20 bicycles were rolled out in July and are operated by Zagster. The cost of the program was about $36,000. The Michigan Department of Transportation kicked in a $12,00 grant and other costs are shared by the city’s Downtown Development Authority and partnerships with the St. Clair Community College, the Blue Water Conventions and Visitors Bureau, and a law firm in the city, according to the report provided to Royal Oak officials. “Port Huron has a very effective program and is about half the size in population as Royal Oak,” said Royal Oak City Commissioner Jeremy Mahrle. “I know Oakland County is (also) interested in investing in countywide bike-share programs.” James Krizan, assistant to City Manager Don Johnson, outlined some of the benefits and challenges of launching a bike-share rental program for city commissioners this week. “We’re definitely on our way to creating a robust bicycle culture here,” Krizan said of city plans to create more bike lanes. “I think it’s pretty cool and we should be exploring it,” said Mayor Michael Fournier. Royal Oak plans to add bike lanes on Campbell Road from 10 Mile to Fourth Street, which already has lanes from Campbell to the downtown. The main north-south bike route would start on Washington Avenue and run to Euclid Avenue, just north of Crooks Road. The route would then run east and west on Euclid to Main Street, which would have lanes leading to Normandy at the city’s border with Clawson. City commissioners voted Monday to have the Royal Oak’s traffic committee conduct public discussions on bicycle sharing and come back with a recommendation for commissioners. Source: Mike McConnell, The Daily Tribune
    140 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • ROYAL OAK, MI — A bike share system for Royal Oak could be in the works. City Commissioners directed staff to gather public input on the idea after a preliminary study found that programs have been successfully started in other nearby communities. “Dearborn residents and visitors have embraced our bike share program with enthusiasm,” said Mary Laundroche, a spokeswoman for the city. “In the first two months of operation, the number of rides surpassed expectations, and the bikes just keep getting used more and more in our downtown areas and beyond. It’s been especially appealing to Millenials.” The MoGo bike share in the greater downtown Detroit area has 430 bikes at 43 stations and started up in May. In Port Huron four bike share stations with 20 bicycles were rolled out in July and are operated by Zagster. The cost of the program was about $36,000. The Michigan Department of Transportation kicked in a $12,00 grant and other costs are shared by the city’s Downtown Development Authority and partnerships with the St. Clair Community College, the Blue Water Conventions and Visitors Bureau, and a law firm in the city, according to the report provided to Royal Oak officials. “Port Huron has a very effective program and is about half the size in population as Royal Oak,” said Royal Oak City Commissioner Jeremy Mahrle. “I know Oakland County is (also) interested in investing in countywide bike-share programs.” James Krizan, assistant to City Manager Don Johnson, outlined some of the benefits and challenges of launching a bike-share rental program for city commissioners this week. “We’re definitely on our way to creating a robust bicycle culture here,” Krizan said of city plans to create more bike lanes. “I think it’s pretty cool and we should be exploring it,” said Mayor Michael Fournier. Royal Oak plans to add bike lanes on Campbell Road from 10 Mile to Fourth Street, which already has lanes from Campbell to the downtown. The main north-south bike route would start on Washington Avenue and run to Euclid Avenue, just north of Crooks Road. The route would then run east and west on Euclid to Main Street, which would have lanes leading to Normandy at the city’s border with Clawson. City commissioners voted Monday to have the Royal Oak’s traffic committee conduct public discussions on bicycle sharing and come back with a recommendation for commissioners. Source: Mike McConnell, The Daily Tribune
    Sep 26, 2017 140
  • 22 May 2017
    Troy Times, Terry Oparka ― The Troy trails and pathways program will move forward as work continues on the first segment. The first segment will begin at Troy City Hall, on Big Beaver Road, and will proceed north on Livernois Road through the new P. Terry and Barbara Knight Park, then along Wattles, ending at Livernois Road. Troy's city council unanimously approved the $157 million 2017-18 and three-year city budget May 8, which includes stipends of $750,000 each year for the Troy trails and pathways program. The plan for a non-motorized pathway throughout the city stalled in 2015 when the state withdrew a $600,000 grant for a proposed trails and pathways system when residents in the Hills of Charnwood subdivision, located west of Coolidge Highway and north of Square Lake Road, objected to the pathway going through their subdivision. The plan aims to connect the trails and pathways along major roadways to "nodes" — identified in that plan as parks, city destinations such as the Troy Historical Museum and the Stage Nature Center, and places of worship. These nodes are different than the neighborhood nodes defined in the city’s current master plan. Read the full article @ Troy Times, C&G News
    214 Posted by Aaron L. Dylewski
  • Troy Times, Terry Oparka ― The Troy trails and pathways program will move forward as work continues on the first segment. The first segment will begin at Troy City Hall, on Big Beaver Road, and will proceed north on Livernois Road through the new P. Terry and Barbara Knight Park, then along Wattles, ending at Livernois Road. Troy's city council unanimously approved the $157 million 2017-18 and three-year city budget May 8, which includes stipends of $750,000 each year for the Troy trails and pathways program. The plan for a non-motorized pathway throughout the city stalled in 2015 when the state withdrew a $600,000 grant for a proposed trails and pathways system when residents in the Hills of Charnwood subdivision, located west of Coolidge Highway and north of Square Lake Road, objected to the pathway going through their subdivision. The plan aims to connect the trails and pathways along major roadways to "nodes" — identified in that plan as parks, city destinations such as the Troy Historical Museum and the Stage Nature Center, and places of worship. These nodes are different than the neighborhood nodes defined in the city’s current master plan. Read the full article @ Troy Times, C&G News
    May 22, 2017 214
  • 09 May 2017
    MLive.com, Amy Biolchini Grand Rapids city officials are working to make sure the next generation of motorists understand local bicycle safety laws. The city's education materials on local laws are being included in the curriculum at 11 driver's education schools in West Michigan in 2017, officials announced Monday May 8th. "It's vital to help new student-drivers grow their understanding of the proper interactions and responsibilities between motorists and bicyclists in traffic, as well as to help Grand Rapids build a culture of mutual respect between bicyclists and motorists that, ultimately, reduces crashes," said the city's Traffic Safety Manager Chris Zull of the driver's education schools. City officials are hoping educating new drivers about local laws - especially the city's five-foot passing rule for bicycles - will help reduce future crashes. Grand Rapids passed a law in 2015 to that requires drivers keep at least five feet between their vehicle and the bicyclist they are passing. Bicyclists in Grand Rapids are also required to have a white light on the front of their bike and red reflector or light on the back of their bike if riding at night. The lights must be visible from a distance of 500 feet, or the length of a city block. Kalamazoo adopted a similar five-foot law in September 2016, and Ann Arbor followed suit in December 2016. This year, Grand Rapids law enforcement officials are focusing their efforts on the danger that comes with bicyclists riding on the sidewalk - a practice that's illegal in most parts of downtown Grand Rapids. Police say bicyclists are more visible when they ride in the street with the flow of traffic, as opposed to riding on the sidewalks or against the flow of traffic.
    205 Posted by Systems Admin
  • MLive.com, Amy Biolchini Grand Rapids city officials are working to make sure the next generation of motorists understand local bicycle safety laws. The city's education materials on local laws are being included in the curriculum at 11 driver's education schools in West Michigan in 2017, officials announced Monday May 8th. "It's vital to help new student-drivers grow their understanding of the proper interactions and responsibilities between motorists and bicyclists in traffic, as well as to help Grand Rapids build a culture of mutual respect between bicyclists and motorists that, ultimately, reduces crashes," said the city's Traffic Safety Manager Chris Zull of the driver's education schools. City officials are hoping educating new drivers about local laws - especially the city's five-foot passing rule for bicycles - will help reduce future crashes. Grand Rapids passed a law in 2015 to that requires drivers keep at least five feet between their vehicle and the bicyclist they are passing. Bicyclists in Grand Rapids are also required to have a white light on the front of their bike and red reflector or light on the back of their bike if riding at night. The lights must be visible from a distance of 500 feet, or the length of a city block. Kalamazoo adopted a similar five-foot law in September 2016, and Ann Arbor followed suit in December 2016. This year, Grand Rapids law enforcement officials are focusing their efforts on the danger that comes with bicyclists riding on the sidewalk - a practice that's illegal in most parts of downtown Grand Rapids. Police say bicyclists are more visible when they ride in the street with the flow of traffic, as opposed to riding on the sidewalks or against the flow of traffic.
    May 09, 2017 205
  • 06 May 2017
    Business Insider, Matthew DeBord ― When I learned to drive, cars were pretty easy to understand: they ran on gas, which was fairly cheap, and they had radios.  Other transportation options were limited to boats, buses, trains, planes, and motorcycles. If you lived in a big city, you got around using mass transit and your feet. Fast forward a few decades and the types of transportation are essentially the same, but the automobile has been radically remade by technology and the auto industry is being roiled by everything from electric vehicles and self-driving cars to ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft. The biggest change to air travel has been the cost, which has come way down since I was 16. Obviously, I cover transportation and have had a front-row seat for the last decade as a deluge of change has arrived. You might think that if I were to look back, I'd say that the electric car is the biggest change I've seen. Tesla is a $50-billion-market-cap company after all — larger by that measure that Ford and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles! But you'd be wrong. By far the biggest transportation change I've seen is the explosion in bicycle riding. I lived away from the New York area over a decade ago, and while I rode a bike when I lived in NYC, I was unprepared for the proliferation of bikes on my return. Bikes, bikes, everywhere Bike-sharing schemes like CitiBike have two-wheeled conveyances scattered throughout Manhattan. And although everybody in the 1990s got used to dodging bike messengers, nowadays we dodge commuters — or folks who just want to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge. There are bike lanes everywhere — and bike-oriented traffic signals. People ride their bikes year round, rain, shine, sleet, or snow.  I feel as if there are now as many bike shops as there once were Greek coffee shops and dive bars.  This change isn't limited to New York. Cycling has boomed in many other American cities. Whole new genres of bicycles have arrived: bikes with electric-assist motors, bikes with extra carrying capacity (the SUVs of bikes), sleek fixies, fat-tired cruisers, throwback hybrid bikes. This has quietly become a big deal. Whereas 20 years ago, you took your life into your own hands if you tried to ride from New York's Upper East Side to Midtown, these days a vast flotilla of bikes has been integrated into the city's transportation ecosystem. "More than three-quarters of a million New Yorkers ride a bike regularly—250,000 more than just five years ago." the NYC Department of Transportation said in its "Cycling in the City" report. It is estimated that over 450,000 cycling trips are made each day in New York City—triple the amount taken 15 years ago." Honestly, I didn't see this coming, but I'm glad it did. Some changes on transportation are disorienting. But this one is welcome.
    207 Posted by Systems Admin
  • Business Insider, Matthew DeBord ― When I learned to drive, cars were pretty easy to understand: they ran on gas, which was fairly cheap, and they had radios.  Other transportation options were limited to boats, buses, trains, planes, and motorcycles. If you lived in a big city, you got around using mass transit and your feet. Fast forward a few decades and the types of transportation are essentially the same, but the automobile has been radically remade by technology and the auto industry is being roiled by everything from electric vehicles and self-driving cars to ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft. The biggest change to air travel has been the cost, which has come way down since I was 16. Obviously, I cover transportation and have had a front-row seat for the last decade as a deluge of change has arrived. You might think that if I were to look back, I'd say that the electric car is the biggest change I've seen. Tesla is a $50-billion-market-cap company after all — larger by that measure that Ford and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles! But you'd be wrong. By far the biggest transportation change I've seen is the explosion in bicycle riding. I lived away from the New York area over a decade ago, and while I rode a bike when I lived in NYC, I was unprepared for the proliferation of bikes on my return. Bikes, bikes, everywhere Bike-sharing schemes like CitiBike have two-wheeled conveyances scattered throughout Manhattan. And although everybody in the 1990s got used to dodging bike messengers, nowadays we dodge commuters — or folks who just want to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge. There are bike lanes everywhere — and bike-oriented traffic signals. People ride their bikes year round, rain, shine, sleet, or snow.  I feel as if there are now as many bike shops as there once were Greek coffee shops and dive bars.  This change isn't limited to New York. Cycling has boomed in many other American cities. Whole new genres of bicycles have arrived: bikes with electric-assist motors, bikes with extra carrying capacity (the SUVs of bikes), sleek fixies, fat-tired cruisers, throwback hybrid bikes. This has quietly become a big deal. Whereas 20 years ago, you took your life into your own hands if you tried to ride from New York's Upper East Side to Midtown, these days a vast flotilla of bikes has been integrated into the city's transportation ecosystem. "More than three-quarters of a million New Yorkers ride a bike regularly—250,000 more than just five years ago." the NYC Department of Transportation said in its "Cycling in the City" report. It is estimated that over 450,000 cycling trips are made each day in New York City—triple the amount taken 15 years ago." Honestly, I didn't see this coming, but I'm glad it did. Some changes on transportation are disorienting. But this one is welcome.
    May 06, 2017 207