Blogs

The blogs are good way to keep track of local riders, regional bike news and events.

Writers will often do write-ups about local biking events, new routes, views, bike-checks or demonstrations.

User's Tags

Aaron Lad 's Entries

15 blogs
  • 13 Apr 2016
    The city of Birmingham recently put the final touches on it's recreational bike route. You can view the route here. The project is a part of a recommendation from Birmingham's Multi-Modal Transportation Plan which was created in 2013 to redesign public roads so that Birmingham's urban corridors are safely accessible to cyclists. View the plan here. City Engineer Paul O’Meara said the goal is to have the neighborhood connector route up and running this summer. “We have a master plan and this is one of the best representative examples that we’re trying to welcome other modes of transportation,” O’Meara said. The route is approximately 6-miles long it uses existing streets, with two exceptions along Oak Street and North Eton Avenue where a half-mile long bike-lane has been installed. Otherwise, the system currently relies on surface-street welfare with a series of directional signs and pavement marking.    
    56 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The city of Birmingham recently put the final touches on it's recreational bike route. You can view the route here. The project is a part of a recommendation from Birmingham's Multi-Modal Transportation Plan which was created in 2013 to redesign public roads so that Birmingham's urban corridors are safely accessible to cyclists. View the plan here. City Engineer Paul O’Meara said the goal is to have the neighborhood connector route up and running this summer. “We have a master plan and this is one of the best representative examples that we’re trying to welcome other modes of transportation,” O’Meara said. The route is approximately 6-miles long it uses existing streets, with two exceptions along Oak Street and North Eton Avenue where a half-mile long bike-lane has been installed. Otherwise, the system currently relies on surface-street welfare with a series of directional signs and pavement marking.    
    Apr 13, 2016 56
  • 03 Apr 2016
    The city of Ferndale, in collaboration with five other communities, was awarded $200,000 from the 2016 Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) this with the aims at creating the Woodward Corridor Neighborhood Bicycle Network the will connect six cities. The TAP grant was penned by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The grant is for a bike path network that connects Ferndale, Hazel Park, Huntington Woods, Oak Park, Pleasant Ridge and Royal Oak. City Planner Justin Lyons said the purpose of the network is to connect the communities as well as provide easier transportation via bicycle, which fits in with the city’s goal of opening up the use of multiple modes of transportation. “Our purpose was quality of life and safety and helping residents and businesses in Ferndale and the surrounding corridor,” Lyons said. “People can get from downtown Hazel Park to Oak Park in a connected route, and we have seen projects like this spur further interests in development, like Livernois, where businesses are moving in because the city is making improvements there.” The 17-mile loop includes central main business districts, 13 parks, 10 schools, two libraries and one university.
    35 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The city of Ferndale, in collaboration with five other communities, was awarded $200,000 from the 2016 Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) this with the aims at creating the Woodward Corridor Neighborhood Bicycle Network the will connect six cities. The TAP grant was penned by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The grant is for a bike path network that connects Ferndale, Hazel Park, Huntington Woods, Oak Park, Pleasant Ridge and Royal Oak. City Planner Justin Lyons said the purpose of the network is to connect the communities as well as provide easier transportation via bicycle, which fits in with the city’s goal of opening up the use of multiple modes of transportation. “Our purpose was quality of life and safety and helping residents and businesses in Ferndale and the surrounding corridor,” Lyons said. “People can get from downtown Hazel Park to Oak Park in a connected route, and we have seen projects like this spur further interests in development, like Livernois, where businesses are moving in because the city is making improvements there.” The 17-mile loop includes central main business districts, 13 parks, 10 schools, two libraries and one university.
    Apr 03, 2016 35
  • 25 Jan 2017
    This past Tuesday the city of Detroit held a ground breaking ceremony at Tolan Feild for a $4-million dollar multi-sport velodrome complex. Construction of the facility will begin this spring. It is projected to be completed sometime this summer. The project is currently being funded by The Detroit Fitness Foundation(DFF). In addition to the indoor velodrome, the DFF is donating $125,000 for additional outdoor improvements, like a small skate park, a practice soccer field. The city has also committed a cool $250,000 for some improved outdoor features including playground equipment, a picnic shelter, tables, fitness station and horseshoe pits. The city's mayor, Mike Duggan said "Having safe and healthy spaces within our neighborhoods for families to live and play is essential to our city's continued growth. The Detroit Fitness Foundation initiative will be a great asset to our community and its residents." The velodrome was designed by Dale Hughes a resident of Rochester Hills. Dale has designed and built more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta and the 2015 Pan Am Games Velodrome in Toronto. Hughes is the executive director of the DFF and the owner of V-Worldwide, a construction company specializing in velodrome construction. "Our goal is to provide kids with opportunities to turn the Olympic dream into a reality," Hughes said. "I've had the honor of working on projects around the world but I am thrilled to bring this state-of-the-art indoor complex to my back yard in the city of Detroit!" DFF is seeking a naming rights sponsor and offering additional sponsorship opportunities for the complex. More to come soon!
    112 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • This past Tuesday the city of Detroit held a ground breaking ceremony at Tolan Feild for a $4-million dollar multi-sport velodrome complex. Construction of the facility will begin this spring. It is projected to be completed sometime this summer. The project is currently being funded by The Detroit Fitness Foundation(DFF). In addition to the indoor velodrome, the DFF is donating $125,000 for additional outdoor improvements, like a small skate park, a practice soccer field. The city has also committed a cool $250,000 for some improved outdoor features including playground equipment, a picnic shelter, tables, fitness station and horseshoe pits. The city's mayor, Mike Duggan said "Having safe and healthy spaces within our neighborhoods for families to live and play is essential to our city's continued growth. The Detroit Fitness Foundation initiative will be a great asset to our community and its residents." The velodrome was designed by Dale Hughes a resident of Rochester Hills. Dale has designed and built more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the 1996 Olympic Velodrome in Atlanta and the 2015 Pan Am Games Velodrome in Toronto. Hughes is the executive director of the DFF and the owner of V-Worldwide, a construction company specializing in velodrome construction. "Our goal is to provide kids with opportunities to turn the Olympic dream into a reality," Hughes said. "I've had the honor of working on projects around the world but I am thrilled to bring this state-of-the-art indoor complex to my back yard in the city of Detroit!" DFF is seeking a naming rights sponsor and offering additional sponsorship opportunities for the complex. More to come soon!
    Jan 25, 2017 112
  • 05 Oct 2016
    Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    272 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    Oct 05, 2016 272
  • 03 Aug 2016
    Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    184 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    Aug 03, 2016 184