Blogs

The blogs are good way to keep track of local riders, regional bike news and events.

Writers will often do write-ups about local biking events, new routes, views, bike-checks or demonstrations.

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Aaron Lad 's Entries

2 blogs
  • 07 Nov 2017
    Downtown Publications ― By the end of 2018, metro Detroit is set to have more dedicated bicycle lanes and paths than New York City, San Francisco or Los Angeles. It will also be home to one of only two permanent indoor cycling velodromes in the country. At the center of the bicycle revolution is Rochester Hills resident Dale Hughes, who has designed and constructed more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the International Velodrome at Bloomer Park in Rochester Hills, as well as the Indoor Multi-Sport facility featuring a world class velodrome at Tolan Playfield in Detroit. Set to open by the end of the year, the $4 million indoor multi-sport facility at Tolan Playfeild is being constructed without tax funds through the non-profit Detroit Fitness Foundation, of which Hughes serves as executive director, and an "angel" donor from metro Detroit. "It will be the second velodrome in Michigan and one of about 25 in the United States," Hughes said. "Most of them are old, going back a good 30 or 40 years." That was until Hughes started designing and building velodromes on a regular basis, beginning with a 250-meter track in Atlanta, Georgia, which was built for the 1996 Olympic Games. Since then, he has built velodromes for the 2002 and 2006 Olympic Games; the 2015 Pam Am Games in Toronto; the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India; and national training facilities in Israel, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan and other countries, as well as tracks in Santa Rosa, Denver, Chicago, Cleveland and other places. Yet for all of his work creating velodromes, Hughes didn't initially get interested in cycling until after graduating from Oakland University with a business degree and deciding to open a local bicycle shop. "I was born in Highland Park, then moved to the farmland of Rochester and went to Rochester High and Oakland University," he said. "I wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I visited my sister in Germany and discovered cycling. I asked my dad to loan me $9,000, which is how much I knew he had, and another friend did the same and we opened a bike shop." A few years later, Hughes met Wolverine Sports Club cycling coach Mike Walden, who had trained Olympic-winning cyclists. Walden suggested Hughes work on building a velodrome. Hughes partnered with a friend and built a portable velodrome as he toured around the country for events. In 1981 the portable track was stolen when someone drove off with the trucks and trailers used to transport the velodrome. "We had it in three trailers and trucks. We thought it was secure, but they drove off with it," Hughes said. "It wasn't insured. We kept looking for six years for boarded up houses with Schwinn logos on it because they were one of the sponsors." (LOL) In 1995 after getting a call from the U.S. Olympic committee to construct a track for the summer games in Atlanta, Dale took up the opportunity and started up again. With his newest endeavor as executive director of the Detroit Fitness Foundation, Hughes hopes to attract international athletes while promoting fitness in the city. Which is good because the new position means less time away from home, building new velodromes, and more time focusing on home. Read full article @ Downtown Publications | Photo by: Jean Lannen
    48 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Downtown Publications ― By the end of 2018, metro Detroit is set to have more dedicated bicycle lanes and paths than New York City, San Francisco or Los Angeles. It will also be home to one of only two permanent indoor cycling velodromes in the country. At the center of the bicycle revolution is Rochester Hills resident Dale Hughes, who has designed and constructed more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the International Velodrome at Bloomer Park in Rochester Hills, as well as the Indoor Multi-Sport facility featuring a world class velodrome at Tolan Playfield in Detroit. Set to open by the end of the year, the $4 million indoor multi-sport facility at Tolan Playfeild is being constructed without tax funds through the non-profit Detroit Fitness Foundation, of which Hughes serves as executive director, and an "angel" donor from metro Detroit. "It will be the second velodrome in Michigan and one of about 25 in the United States," Hughes said. "Most of them are old, going back a good 30 or 40 years." That was until Hughes started designing and building velodromes on a regular basis, beginning with a 250-meter track in Atlanta, Georgia, which was built for the 1996 Olympic Games. Since then, he has built velodromes for the 2002 and 2006 Olympic Games; the 2015 Pam Am Games in Toronto; the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India; and national training facilities in Israel, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan and other countries, as well as tracks in Santa Rosa, Denver, Chicago, Cleveland and other places. Yet for all of his work creating velodromes, Hughes didn't initially get interested in cycling until after graduating from Oakland University with a business degree and deciding to open a local bicycle shop. "I was born in Highland Park, then moved to the farmland of Rochester and went to Rochester High and Oakland University," he said. "I wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I visited my sister in Germany and discovered cycling. I asked my dad to loan me $9,000, which is how much I knew he had, and another friend did the same and we opened a bike shop." A few years later, Hughes met Wolverine Sports Club cycling coach Mike Walden, who had trained Olympic-winning cyclists. Walden suggested Hughes work on building a velodrome. Hughes partnered with a friend and built a portable velodrome as he toured around the country for events. In 1981 the portable track was stolen when someone drove off with the trucks and trailers used to transport the velodrome. "We had it in three trailers and trucks. We thought it was secure, but they drove off with it," Hughes said. "It wasn't insured. We kept looking for six years for boarded up houses with Schwinn logos on it because they were one of the sponsors." (LOL) In 1995 after getting a call from the U.S. Olympic committee to construct a track for the summer games in Atlanta, Dale took up the opportunity and started up again. With his newest endeavor as executive director of the Detroit Fitness Foundation, Hughes hopes to attract international athletes while promoting fitness in the city. Which is good because the new position means less time away from home, building new velodromes, and more time focusing on home. Read full article @ Downtown Publications | Photo by: Jean Lannen
    Nov 07, 2017 48
  • 25 Sep 2017
    With Open Streets Detroit coming up on October 1 — a festival where 3.5 miles of Michigan Avenue and Vernor will be closed to all vehicle traffic and turn into a giant street festival — our host, Sven Gustafson, figured that this was the perfect time to check in with Lisa Nuszkowski. She is a wearer of many hats. Not only is she part of making the Open Streets Detroit event happen, she is the Founder & Executive Director of the MoGo Detroit Bike Share. Show highlights: The upcoming Open Streets Detroit this weekend [1m18s] (October 1) and all of the activities running from Beacon Park in downtown Detroit all the way through Southwest Detroit. We get an update on the Detroit bike share system, MoGo [8m54s] that has 430 bikes across 43 stations. MoGo Bike share will be offering free rides throughout Open Streets Detroit on October 1. [10m42s] How has education been going [12m01, and what about theft and other challenges? [18m49s] What about funding? How does that play into making the MoGo project more equitable? [19m58s] And the suburbs? It’s a real possibility. It’s a matter of funding (Editor’s note: MoGo is not a government service provided by the city of Detroit. It’s has a nonprofit structure). [24m32s] For more infomation visit the The Daily Detroit Podcast
    45 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • With Open Streets Detroit coming up on October 1 — a festival where 3.5 miles of Michigan Avenue and Vernor will be closed to all vehicle traffic and turn into a giant street festival — our host, Sven Gustafson, figured that this was the perfect time to check in with Lisa Nuszkowski. She is a wearer of many hats. Not only is she part of making the Open Streets Detroit event happen, she is the Founder & Executive Director of the MoGo Detroit Bike Share. Show highlights: The upcoming Open Streets Detroit this weekend [1m18s] (October 1) and all of the activities running from Beacon Park in downtown Detroit all the way through Southwest Detroit. We get an update on the Detroit bike share system, MoGo [8m54s] that has 430 bikes across 43 stations. MoGo Bike share will be offering free rides throughout Open Streets Detroit on October 1. [10m42s] How has education been going [12m01, and what about theft and other challenges? [18m49s] What about funding? How does that play into making the MoGo project more equitable? [19m58s] And the suburbs? It’s a real possibility. It’s a matter of funding (Editor’s note: MoGo is not a government service provided by the city of Detroit. It’s has a nonprofit structure). [24m32s] For more infomation visit the The Daily Detroit Podcast
    Sep 25, 2017 45