Blogs

The blogs are good way to keep track of local riders, regional bike news and events.

Writers will often do write-ups about local biking events, new routes, views, bike-checks or demonstrations.

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Aaron Lad 's Entries

4 blogs
  • 13 Mar 2017
    Momentum Magazine — US cities are undergoing rapid changes. The rising costs of road building and maintenance, combined with out-of-control congestion and urban pollution, are forcing many cities to rethink the way they allocate space on the roads. Where 10, even five years ago, widening or expanding driving lanes seemed like an economically feasible and practical solution to urban transportation demands, the tide is beginning to change. Cities are beginning to realize that prioritizing cars in transportation planning is not only expensive in the short term, but comes with a whole whack of externalities such as lost productivity due to time spent in traffic, decreasing mental and physical health of residents, and a compromised environment. So it doesn’t come as much of a surprise that, in the recently released 2015 Menino Survey of Mayors, a full 70% of mayors surveyed responded “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” when presented with the idea, “Cities should make their roads more accessible to bicycles even if it means sacrificing driving lanes and/ or parking.” The Menino Survey – a project of the US Conference of Mayors and the Boston University Initiative on Cities– interviewed 89 mayors from 31 different states on a wide range of issues affecting urban policy in the US. Of those surveyed, 63 were mayors of cities with over 100,000 residents, and the demographics of each city on indicators such as population density, racial demographics, and economic characteristics represent the diversity of the nation as a whole. See the full article and surveys @ Momentum Magazine
    145 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Momentum Magazine — US cities are undergoing rapid changes. The rising costs of road building and maintenance, combined with out-of-control congestion and urban pollution, are forcing many cities to rethink the way they allocate space on the roads. Where 10, even five years ago, widening or expanding driving lanes seemed like an economically feasible and practical solution to urban transportation demands, the tide is beginning to change. Cities are beginning to realize that prioritizing cars in transportation planning is not only expensive in the short term, but comes with a whole whack of externalities such as lost productivity due to time spent in traffic, decreasing mental and physical health of residents, and a compromised environment. So it doesn’t come as much of a surprise that, in the recently released 2015 Menino Survey of Mayors, a full 70% of mayors surveyed responded “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” when presented with the idea, “Cities should make their roads more accessible to bicycles even if it means sacrificing driving lanes and/ or parking.” The Menino Survey – a project of the US Conference of Mayors and the Boston University Initiative on Cities– interviewed 89 mayors from 31 different states on a wide range of issues affecting urban policy in the US. Of those surveyed, 63 were mayors of cities with over 100,000 residents, and the demographics of each city on indicators such as population density, racial demographics, and economic characteristics represent the diversity of the nation as a whole. See the full article and surveys @ Momentum Magazine
    Mar 13, 2017 145
  • 08 Mar 2017
    SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    112 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    Mar 08, 2017 112
  • 05 Oct 2016
    Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    320 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Monday October 3rd Royal Oak's city commission members hosted a round table town hall discussion to discuss Royal Oak's new non-motorized transportaion plan.  The meeting gave an opportunity for residents and non-residents to voice their views and opinions about biking in and around the city. There were about 50 individuals participating in the discussion. Many spoke about their concerns regarding Main Street's now defunct bike lanes, local laws and ordanaces and how the city needed to educate motorists more about road bikeing. The Mayor Jim Ellison and the commission talked about perhaps implementing an Idaho stop law at which legally treats treat stop signs as though they were yeild signs or red lights as though they were stop signs. But nothing was confirmed. Some of the commissioners, that admittingly don't ride bikes, stated that they wanted to see the sharrows removed from the main streets. The mayor defended the sharrows saying that, "Taking the sharrows off the roads won't change the conditions for cyclists." And that, "The sharrows indicate to motorists that bicyclists will be on the roads." Thus adding a level of security that otherwise wouldn't be there.
    Oct 05, 2016 320
  • 03 Aug 2016
    Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    222 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Detroit's Fitzgerald neighborhood is working with city officials to repurpose blinghted spaces, turning the land into Greenway spaces, or people-friendly bicycle-friendly promenading spaces.   This is the neighborhood's first shot at repurposing land left bare by the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s demolition brigade. The city’s Housing and Revitalization Department and its Planning and Development Department are seeking developers to take on a two-phase green space revitalization project that will renovate 100 vacant houses, turn 250 vacant lots into urban orchards, gardens and parks. A greenway through the neighborhood would connect the University of Detroit Mercy and Marygrove College. The Fitzgerald project is one of what Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan calls “20-minute neighborhoods” – neighborhoods with necessities such as grocery stores and laundromats within a 20-minute walk. (Source: The Detroit News)
    Aug 03, 2016 222