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The blogs are good way to keep track of local riders, regional bike news and events.

Writers will often do write-ups about local biking events, new routes, views, bike-checks or demonstrations.

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Aaron Lad 's Entries

15 blogs
  • 22 May 2017
    Troy Times, Terry Oparka ― The Troy trails and pathways program will move forward as work continues on the first segment. The first segment will begin at Troy City Hall, on Big Beaver Road, and will proceed north on Livernois Road through the new P. Terry and Barbara Knight Park, then along Wattles, ending at Livernois Road. Troy's city council unanimously approved the $157 million 2017-18 and three-year city budget May 8, which includes stipends of $750,000 each year for the Troy trails and pathways program. The plan for a non-motorized pathway throughout the city stalled in 2015 when the state withdrew a $600,000 grant for a proposed trails and pathways system when residents in the Hills of Charnwood subdivision, located west of Coolidge Highway and north of Square Lake Road, objected to the pathway going through their subdivision. The plan aims to connect the trails and pathways along major roadways to "nodes" — identified in that plan as parks, city destinations such as the Troy Historical Museum and the Stage Nature Center, and places of worship. These nodes are different than the neighborhood nodes defined in the city’s current master plan. Read the full article @ Troy Times, C&G News
    42 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Troy Times, Terry Oparka ― The Troy trails and pathways program will move forward as work continues on the first segment. The first segment will begin at Troy City Hall, on Big Beaver Road, and will proceed north on Livernois Road through the new P. Terry and Barbara Knight Park, then along Wattles, ending at Livernois Road. Troy's city council unanimously approved the $157 million 2017-18 and three-year city budget May 8, which includes stipends of $750,000 each year for the Troy trails and pathways program. The plan for a non-motorized pathway throughout the city stalled in 2015 when the state withdrew a $600,000 grant for a proposed trails and pathways system when residents in the Hills of Charnwood subdivision, located west of Coolidge Highway and north of Square Lake Road, objected to the pathway going through their subdivision. The plan aims to connect the trails and pathways along major roadways to "nodes" — identified in that plan as parks, city destinations such as the Troy Historical Museum and the Stage Nature Center, and places of worship. These nodes are different than the neighborhood nodes defined in the city’s current master plan. Read the full article @ Troy Times, C&G News
    May 22, 2017 42
  • 02 May 2017
    Detroit Bike Share, an affiliate of the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DPP), in collaboration with the City of Detroit, Henry Ford Health System (HFHS), and Health Alliance Plan (HAP) announced today Detroit’s first public bike share system will be named MoGo. "We are thrilled to introduce Detroit to MoGo,” says Lisa Nuszkowski, executive director of MoGo, Detroit Bike Share. “Today’s announcement continues the city’s mobility evolution, providing Detroiters and visitors alike with more accessible options to move around the city." In May, MoGo will offer 430 bikes at 43 stations throughout 10 neighborhoods. Pass and pricing options include a daily pass and unlimited 30-minute trips for $8 per day, a monthly pass for $18, and an $80-per-year annual pass that gives riders the option to pay the total upfront or $8 per month, and offers unlimited 30-minute trips for a full year. "Bike share has been proven to be an invaluable addition to public transit in cities across the country," says Dan Dirks, director of the Detroit Department of Transportation. "We are very excited about this addition to Detroit’s transit system and look forward to its success." MoGo’s 10,000-square foot warehouse, located in Detroit’s Milwaukee Junction neighborhood, currently houses 18 seasonal and permanent employees. More information can be found on MoGo’s website.
    43 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Detroit Bike Share, an affiliate of the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DPP), in collaboration with the City of Detroit, Henry Ford Health System (HFHS), and Health Alliance Plan (HAP) announced today Detroit’s first public bike share system will be named MoGo. "We are thrilled to introduce Detroit to MoGo,” says Lisa Nuszkowski, executive director of MoGo, Detroit Bike Share. “Today’s announcement continues the city’s mobility evolution, providing Detroiters and visitors alike with more accessible options to move around the city." In May, MoGo will offer 430 bikes at 43 stations throughout 10 neighborhoods. Pass and pricing options include a daily pass and unlimited 30-minute trips for $8 per day, a monthly pass for $18, and an $80-per-year annual pass that gives riders the option to pay the total upfront or $8 per month, and offers unlimited 30-minute trips for a full year. "Bike share has been proven to be an invaluable addition to public transit in cities across the country," says Dan Dirks, director of the Detroit Department of Transportation. "We are very excited about this addition to Detroit’s transit system and look forward to its success." MoGo’s 10,000-square foot warehouse, located in Detroit’s Milwaukee Junction neighborhood, currently houses 18 seasonal and permanent employees. More information can be found on MoGo’s website.
    May 02, 2017 43
  • 05 Apr 2017
    The Fisher Halfpipe is concept art installment curated by Everard Findlay, the project delves into the ideal of how sports such as skateboarding and bmx can transcend social barriers such as race, class or culture. The Halfpipe currently sits in the main arcade of the Fisher Building Lobby. The Fisher Halfpipe opened for public viewing on Monday night. Professional and semi-professional skateboarders, inline-skaters and BMX bikers will be performing on the Halfpipe April 3rd through the 6th. It's open to the public 6pm to 9pm each evening. The event includes live music and stuff to eat. The 26-foot, 16-foot wide halfpipe was built by Ramped Construction. The artwork on the Halfpipe was painted by local artists Hillary Butterworth, Miranda Wedge, and Brian Oscar; their instagrams show the progress as they painted the halfpipe start to finish. The ramp is part of an ongoing project called, “The Fisher Beacon Project.” The campaign aims at drawing-in visitors to the historic building through performance art and interesting exhibitions.
    112 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The Fisher Halfpipe is concept art installment curated by Everard Findlay, the project delves into the ideal of how sports such as skateboarding and bmx can transcend social barriers such as race, class or culture. The Halfpipe currently sits in the main arcade of the Fisher Building Lobby. The Fisher Halfpipe opened for public viewing on Monday night. Professional and semi-professional skateboarders, inline-skaters and BMX bikers will be performing on the Halfpipe April 3rd through the 6th. It's open to the public 6pm to 9pm each evening. The event includes live music and stuff to eat. The 26-foot, 16-foot wide halfpipe was built by Ramped Construction. The artwork on the Halfpipe was painted by local artists Hillary Butterworth, Miranda Wedge, and Brian Oscar; their instagrams show the progress as they painted the halfpipe start to finish. The ramp is part of an ongoing project called, “The Fisher Beacon Project.” The campaign aims at drawing-in visitors to the historic building through performance art and interesting exhibitions.
    Apr 05, 2017 112
  • 01 Apr 2017
    IndustryWeek.com ― After decades of off-shoring and outsourcing established big name bike brands to other countries, the American made industry is now bringing the art of bicycle manufacturing back into the United States. This is happening as oversea trading costs continue to rise and as companies are now realizing the value of local win-win business models. A sign of things to come This shift is happening across the entire spectrum of cycling, from high-end boutique racing bikes, to 3-wheeled trikes, to high-volume manufacturing & assembly; dedicated American biking entrepreneurs are now beginning to reshore bike production into the United States. There is a perfect convergence of factors is happening in the United States these days; rising offshore trading costs, young entrepreneurs seeking bicycle-driven win-win business models, there’s a huge increase of people seeking healthier lifestyle choices, there’s a growing popularity of urban biking with biking-infrastructure interest taking root across the nation like never before, and there’s a new-found patriotism for more robust local biking-driven economies and it’s happening everywhere you look. Domestic production The outsourcing began sometime in the 1980s when Schwinn began shifting its manufacturing to Asia in an effort to take advantage of low working wages; other high-volume manufacturers like Huffy and Trek soon began to follow. By 2015 only 2.5% of the estimated 12.6 million bikes (not including kid’s bikes) that were sold in the U.S. were made in America. In 1990 the United States was one of the top five highest producing bike manufacturing countries on the planet at around 5.5 million units per year. As more outsourcing occurred, the bike production decreased to around 200k. But in 2015 the trend-line began to swiftly take a new direction. In 2015 when offshore wages began to increase, bike manufacturers started to rethink their offshore manufacturing and their material source decisions. Driven by the increasing offshore costs, the savings in automation, and the benefits of having “Made in USA” branding, reshoring bike manufacturing in the states began to make really good sense. Bicycle Corporation of America (BCA) a Division of Kent International Arnold Kamler’s family had been in the bicycle business for a century when, in 1991, he regretfully shuttered his New Jersey bicycle plant, Bicycle Corporation of America (BCA), and moved all of their production offshore. The USA factory had been producing 30% of their bicycles. However, offshore costs began rising enough to make Kamler, now the chairman and CEO of Kent International, begin to consider reshoring some bike manufacturing to the U.S. In 2008, Arnold said, “It was a perfect storm. You had steel, aluminum, oil, plastics, ocean freight and currency – everything at one time going up. I spent about six weeks traveling all over Asia, asking myself, ‘If not China, then where?’ The answer seemed to be nowhere for bicycles. The idea in the back of my mind was that maybe one day we could do it here in the U.S.” Then, in March 2013, at the Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Suppliers Summit for the Walmart 'Made in America' initiative, Arnold met with South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and began discussing the possibility of Kent opening a factory in South Carolina, but the numbers had to make sense. With an annual employee turnover rate of 120% at his Shanghai factory and offshore costs soaring, Kamler turned to innovation and automation to close the total cost gap and return work to the U.S. It would take innovative ideas like thousands of feet of overhead conveyors, the latest wheel-building equipment and other process improvements for the reshoring transition to make economic sense. Kamler’s multi-dimensional approach also included a guarantee from Gov. Haley that Kent’s energy needs and training requirements would be filled. Today, Kent International, Inc. is a high-volume, mass-market bike supplier to Walmart, Toys “R” Us, Target and other retailers. This year they will roll out approximately 350,000 bikes produced in the Manning, S.C. factory, operating with 115 employees and assembling bikes at a rate that would require twice as many workers offshore. Kent has no plans to stop importing and proudly proclaims that they are not trying to reshore their business, they are trying to reshore their competitors’ business. He explained, “We sold 49% of our company to our major bicycle supplier from China in 2010.  When we decided to go forward with our USA production, I pledged to them that the idea was not to replace our import bikes with USA bikes but instead to try to continue to grow our import business and by growing our USA business, this would be stealing market share from other importers.” Americans want to buy more “Made in USA” products American made, locally sourced preference can be an important cornerstone for bringing U.S. manufacturing jobs back home. Recent consumer preference surveys, show there is a definitive preference for American-made goods: 97% have a positive view of the goods manufactured in the U.S. Americans on the whole believe it is important to manufacture in the U.S., and think it is wise to take steps to support American manufacturing, particularly bicycle manufacturing. The Motor City Turns to Bike City In the past several years at least seven bike brands have chosen Detroit as the place to manufacture and assemble bikes. Some brands are classically inspired handcrafted bikes like the Detroit Bicycle Company, some are super cool unique trail bikes like the Slingshot Bikes brand. A local Detroit firefighter founded the locally sourced 313 Bicycle Works. The fancy baggage suitcase and watch maker, Shinola, is now assembling high-end commuter bikes in their Detroit location with forks and frames coming from their partner, Waterford Precision Cycles. Detroit’s largest bike manufacturer Detroit Bikes has plans to produce as many as 50,000 bikes this year; they also won a high-stakes bid with the city that will produce bikes for the new Detroit Bike Sharing Program. Detroit Bikes Wins Bike Sharing Contract When Detroit Bikes first opened the doors in 2013, a lot of people “thought it was really goofy,” says founder Zak Pashak, who chose Detroit because it was “a good spot for urban revitalization to take hold.” Despite the fact that bicycle manufacturing had been disappearing as bike companies followed each other offshore to low cost countries, Pashak, a Canadian transplant, was fascinated with Detroit from childhood through popular TV shows and wanted to be part of its economic rebound. He thought a basic bike, perfect for urban areas, might have potential in the U.S. market. Detroit Bikes’ is set to produce 10,000 bikes this year and in doing so will create 50 jobs in a city with high unemployment. Production began slowly until Pashak got his first big order from New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins, Colo. The company was having trouble finding a U.S.-made bike. Pashak won the 2,500 bike order and was on his way. In the spring of 2016 Pashak won a contract with Motivate, a company that runs bike-sharing programs in 12 metro areas, and uses Detroit Bikes’ assembled bicycles in New York, Boston, and Jersey City. A domestically produced bike gave Motivate a pivotal negotiating advantage when dealing with city governments, yet until finding Detroit Bikes, they struggled to find a U.S. manufacturer that could handle the quantity and specifications they needed. The bikes are assembled in Detroit but the aluminum frames come from Asia. However, Detroit Bikes makes the wheels in-house because they are expensive to transport. According to Motivate’s CEO Jay Walder, manufacturing the wheels domestically enabled the company to reduce the number of shipping containers by two-thirds. Detroit Bikes’ is set to produce 10,000 bikes this year and in doing so will create 50 jobs in a city with high unemployment. Ford Rolls Into the San Francisco Area on a “New” Mode of Transportation In an effort to rework their business strategy for a future where fewer people own cars and shared transportation is commonplace, Ford recently announced it would be collaborating with bike-sharing provider Motivate in San Francisco. “Cities globally are dealing with increased congestion, a growing middle class and environmental issues,” says Jim Hackett, head of the new Ford Smart Mobility unit. “By expanding our business model to include new forms of transportation -- from bikes to dynamic shuttles and more -- we are introducing new customers to Ford and creating new revenue and profit opportunities for the future.” Ford and Motivate are working to add new stations across the Bay Area and expect to expand the network by 7,000 bikes by the end of 2018. Read the Full Article @ IndustryWeekly.com Trunicated and edited, original article by Harry Moser @ IndustryWeek.com
    223 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • IndustryWeek.com ― After decades of off-shoring and outsourcing established big name bike brands to other countries, the American made industry is now bringing the art of bicycle manufacturing back into the United States. This is happening as oversea trading costs continue to rise and as companies are now realizing the value of local win-win business models. A sign of things to come This shift is happening across the entire spectrum of cycling, from high-end boutique racing bikes, to 3-wheeled trikes, to high-volume manufacturing & assembly; dedicated American biking entrepreneurs are now beginning to reshore bike production into the United States. There is a perfect convergence of factors is happening in the United States these days; rising offshore trading costs, young entrepreneurs seeking bicycle-driven win-win business models, there’s a huge increase of people seeking healthier lifestyle choices, there’s a growing popularity of urban biking with biking-infrastructure interest taking root across the nation like never before, and there’s a new-found patriotism for more robust local biking-driven economies and it’s happening everywhere you look. Domestic production The outsourcing began sometime in the 1980s when Schwinn began shifting its manufacturing to Asia in an effort to take advantage of low working wages; other high-volume manufacturers like Huffy and Trek soon began to follow. By 2015 only 2.5% of the estimated 12.6 million bikes (not including kid’s bikes) that were sold in the U.S. were made in America. In 1990 the United States was one of the top five highest producing bike manufacturing countries on the planet at around 5.5 million units per year. As more outsourcing occurred, the bike production decreased to around 200k. But in 2015 the trend-line began to swiftly take a new direction. In 2015 when offshore wages began to increase, bike manufacturers started to rethink their offshore manufacturing and their material source decisions. Driven by the increasing offshore costs, the savings in automation, and the benefits of having “Made in USA” branding, reshoring bike manufacturing in the states began to make really good sense. Bicycle Corporation of America (BCA) a Division of Kent International Arnold Kamler’s family had been in the bicycle business for a century when, in 1991, he regretfully shuttered his New Jersey bicycle plant, Bicycle Corporation of America (BCA), and moved all of their production offshore. The USA factory had been producing 30% of their bicycles. However, offshore costs began rising enough to make Kamler, now the chairman and CEO of Kent International, begin to consider reshoring some bike manufacturing to the U.S. In 2008, Arnold said, “It was a perfect storm. You had steel, aluminum, oil, plastics, ocean freight and currency – everything at one time going up. I spent about six weeks traveling all over Asia, asking myself, ‘If not China, then where?’ The answer seemed to be nowhere for bicycles. The idea in the back of my mind was that maybe one day we could do it here in the U.S.” Then, in March 2013, at the Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Suppliers Summit for the Walmart 'Made in America' initiative, Arnold met with South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and began discussing the possibility of Kent opening a factory in South Carolina, but the numbers had to make sense. With an annual employee turnover rate of 120% at his Shanghai factory and offshore costs soaring, Kamler turned to innovation and automation to close the total cost gap and return work to the U.S. It would take innovative ideas like thousands of feet of overhead conveyors, the latest wheel-building equipment and other process improvements for the reshoring transition to make economic sense. Kamler’s multi-dimensional approach also included a guarantee from Gov. Haley that Kent’s energy needs and training requirements would be filled. Today, Kent International, Inc. is a high-volume, mass-market bike supplier to Walmart, Toys “R” Us, Target and other retailers. This year they will roll out approximately 350,000 bikes produced in the Manning, S.C. factory, operating with 115 employees and assembling bikes at a rate that would require twice as many workers offshore. Kent has no plans to stop importing and proudly proclaims that they are not trying to reshore their business, they are trying to reshore their competitors’ business. He explained, “We sold 49% of our company to our major bicycle supplier from China in 2010.  When we decided to go forward with our USA production, I pledged to them that the idea was not to replace our import bikes with USA bikes but instead to try to continue to grow our import business and by growing our USA business, this would be stealing market share from other importers.” Americans want to buy more “Made in USA” products American made, locally sourced preference can be an important cornerstone for bringing U.S. manufacturing jobs back home. Recent consumer preference surveys, show there is a definitive preference for American-made goods: 97% have a positive view of the goods manufactured in the U.S. Americans on the whole believe it is important to manufacture in the U.S., and think it is wise to take steps to support American manufacturing, particularly bicycle manufacturing. The Motor City Turns to Bike City In the past several years at least seven bike brands have chosen Detroit as the place to manufacture and assemble bikes. Some brands are classically inspired handcrafted bikes like the Detroit Bicycle Company, some are super cool unique trail bikes like the Slingshot Bikes brand. A local Detroit firefighter founded the locally sourced 313 Bicycle Works. The fancy baggage suitcase and watch maker, Shinola, is now assembling high-end commuter bikes in their Detroit location with forks and frames coming from their partner, Waterford Precision Cycles. Detroit’s largest bike manufacturer Detroit Bikes has plans to produce as many as 50,000 bikes this year; they also won a high-stakes bid with the city that will produce bikes for the new Detroit Bike Sharing Program. Detroit Bikes Wins Bike Sharing Contract When Detroit Bikes first opened the doors in 2013, a lot of people “thought it was really goofy,” says founder Zak Pashak, who chose Detroit because it was “a good spot for urban revitalization to take hold.” Despite the fact that bicycle manufacturing had been disappearing as bike companies followed each other offshore to low cost countries, Pashak, a Canadian transplant, was fascinated with Detroit from childhood through popular TV shows and wanted to be part of its economic rebound. He thought a basic bike, perfect for urban areas, might have potential in the U.S. market. Detroit Bikes’ is set to produce 10,000 bikes this year and in doing so will create 50 jobs in a city with high unemployment. Production began slowly until Pashak got his first big order from New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins, Colo. The company was having trouble finding a U.S.-made bike. Pashak won the 2,500 bike order and was on his way. In the spring of 2016 Pashak won a contract with Motivate, a company that runs bike-sharing programs in 12 metro areas, and uses Detroit Bikes’ assembled bicycles in New York, Boston, and Jersey City. A domestically produced bike gave Motivate a pivotal negotiating advantage when dealing with city governments, yet until finding Detroit Bikes, they struggled to find a U.S. manufacturer that could handle the quantity and specifications they needed. The bikes are assembled in Detroit but the aluminum frames come from Asia. However, Detroit Bikes makes the wheels in-house because they are expensive to transport. According to Motivate’s CEO Jay Walder, manufacturing the wheels domestically enabled the company to reduce the number of shipping containers by two-thirds. Detroit Bikes’ is set to produce 10,000 bikes this year and in doing so will create 50 jobs in a city with high unemployment. Ford Rolls Into the San Francisco Area on a “New” Mode of Transportation In an effort to rework their business strategy for a future where fewer people own cars and shared transportation is commonplace, Ford recently announced it would be collaborating with bike-sharing provider Motivate in San Francisco. “Cities globally are dealing with increased congestion, a growing middle class and environmental issues,” says Jim Hackett, head of the new Ford Smart Mobility unit. “By expanding our business model to include new forms of transportation -- from bikes to dynamic shuttles and more -- we are introducing new customers to Ford and creating new revenue and profit opportunities for the future.” Ford and Motivate are working to add new stations across the Bay Area and expect to expand the network by 7,000 bikes by the end of 2018. Read the Full Article @ IndustryWeekly.com Trunicated and edited, original article by Harry Moser @ IndustryWeek.com
    Apr 01, 2017 223
  • 14 Mar 2017
    Pedal to porch is a neighborhood bike ride that includes stops along the route where residents of the neighborhood use their front porch as a space to tell a story. Porch stories sometimes are entertaining, educational, socially or politically charged, and sometimes the porch stories are history lessons about the neighborhoods themselves. Cornetta Lane, the founder of Pedal to Porch, focuses on civic engagement. “Pedal to Porch helps neighbors engage in conversations that they may not have otherwise.” She goes on to say, “Folks don’t know their neighbors anymore; their stories. The best way to bring neighbors together is to host a bike ride that allows neighbors to be introduced to each other.” Pedal to Porch recently received a Knight City Challenge grant which Cornetta plans to use to expand her project beyond this season’s 3-neighborhood route, perhaps into other cities including Washington D.C. and the Boston area. Pedal to Porch has introduced a docu-series, “Pedaler.” It’s a story about the neighborhoods of Detroit from the voices of its residents.  Watch the preview:
    183 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Pedal to porch is a neighborhood bike ride that includes stops along the route where residents of the neighborhood use their front porch as a space to tell a story. Porch stories sometimes are entertaining, educational, socially or politically charged, and sometimes the porch stories are history lessons about the neighborhoods themselves. Cornetta Lane, the founder of Pedal to Porch, focuses on civic engagement. “Pedal to Porch helps neighbors engage in conversations that they may not have otherwise.” She goes on to say, “Folks don’t know their neighbors anymore; their stories. The best way to bring neighbors together is to host a bike ride that allows neighbors to be introduced to each other.” Pedal to Porch recently received a Knight City Challenge grant which Cornetta plans to use to expand her project beyond this season’s 3-neighborhood route, perhaps into other cities including Washington D.C. and the Boston area. Pedal to Porch has introduced a docu-series, “Pedaler.” It’s a story about the neighborhoods of Detroit from the voices of its residents.  Watch the preview:
    Mar 14, 2017 183
  • 13 Mar 2017
    Momentum Magazine — US cities are undergoing rapid changes. The rising costs of road building and maintenance, combined with out-of-control congestion and urban pollution, are forcing many cities to rethink the way they allocate space on the roads. Where 10, even five years ago, widening or expanding driving lanes seemed like an economically feasible and practical solution to urban transportation demands, the tide is beginning to change. Cities are beginning to realize that prioritizing cars in transportation planning is not only expensive in the short term, but comes with a whole whack of externalities such as lost productivity due to time spent in traffic, decreasing mental and physical health of residents, and a compromised environment. So it doesn’t come as much of a surprise that, in the recently released 2015 Menino Survey of Mayors, a full 70% of mayors surveyed responded “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” when presented with the idea, “Cities should make their roads more accessible to bicycles even if it means sacrificing driving lanes and/ or parking.” The Menino Survey – a project of the US Conference of Mayors and the Boston University Initiative on Cities– interviewed 89 mayors from 31 different states on a wide range of issues affecting urban policy in the US. Of those surveyed, 63 were mayors of cities with over 100,000 residents, and the demographics of each city on indicators such as population density, racial demographics, and economic characteristics represent the diversity of the nation as a whole. See the full article and surveys @ Momentum Magazine
    93 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Momentum Magazine — US cities are undergoing rapid changes. The rising costs of road building and maintenance, combined with out-of-control congestion and urban pollution, are forcing many cities to rethink the way they allocate space on the roads. Where 10, even five years ago, widening or expanding driving lanes seemed like an economically feasible and practical solution to urban transportation demands, the tide is beginning to change. Cities are beginning to realize that prioritizing cars in transportation planning is not only expensive in the short term, but comes with a whole whack of externalities such as lost productivity due to time spent in traffic, decreasing mental and physical health of residents, and a compromised environment. So it doesn’t come as much of a surprise that, in the recently released 2015 Menino Survey of Mayors, a full 70% of mayors surveyed responded “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” when presented with the idea, “Cities should make their roads more accessible to bicycles even if it means sacrificing driving lanes and/ or parking.” The Menino Survey – a project of the US Conference of Mayors and the Boston University Initiative on Cities– interviewed 89 mayors from 31 different states on a wide range of issues affecting urban policy in the US. Of those surveyed, 63 were mayors of cities with over 100,000 residents, and the demographics of each city on indicators such as population density, racial demographics, and economic characteristics represent the diversity of the nation as a whole. See the full article and surveys @ Momentum Magazine
    Mar 13, 2017 93
  • 12 Mar 2017
    New York Times — Weekend trips to cities like Boston, Chicago or San Francisco rarely require a rental car to get around, given their extensive public transportation systems. But more unexpected locales are joining the car-optional list as new and expanding rapid transit options take root across the country. “It’s interesting to see how the West in particular is growing and expanding public transportation,” said Virginia Miller, a spokeswoman for the American Public Transportation Association. Detroit The Motor City once had a vital streetcar system, including a track that ran down its main corridor, Woodward Avenue. In April, some 60 years after the old lines were eradicated to make way for cars, the new QLine will restore streetcar service to downtown over a 3.3-mile route. "You can't underestimate the symbolic importance of unveiling mass transit in a city like Detroit, which was built on cars," said Amy S. Eckert, a freelance writer and the author of "100 Things to Do in Detroit Before You Die." The streetcar, of course, is limited relative to the footprint of Detroit, and taxis or shuttles, including a service called Skoot that offers van transportation for $20 a person, are still the most common way to get downtown from the airport. But the project has sparked a building boom as residences, restaurants and shops have moved in along the corridor. Visitors will be able to shuttle along the route for about $1.50 a ride from near the Detroit River downtown to the nearby baseball and football stadiums (professional hockey and basketball facilities are being built and are expected to open this fall). The route also passes through the cultural Midtown district, home to the Detroit Institute of Arts and other museums. Hotels along the streetcar route include the recently opened Aloft Detroit at the David Whitney. "Come April, I don’t think you’ll miss having a car, provided you stay in and around Woodward Avenue, and that’s where most of the renaissance is anyway," Ms. Eckert said. Some areas worth exploring, like the vibrant Corktown neighborhood or Belle Isle Park, are some distance from the streetcar route. For those, there are Uber, Lyft and, also coming in spring, Detroit Bike Share with 43 stations. Read Full Article @ The New York Times
    67 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • New York Times — Weekend trips to cities like Boston, Chicago or San Francisco rarely require a rental car to get around, given their extensive public transportation systems. But more unexpected locales are joining the car-optional list as new and expanding rapid transit options take root across the country. “It’s interesting to see how the West in particular is growing and expanding public transportation,” said Virginia Miller, a spokeswoman for the American Public Transportation Association. Detroit The Motor City once had a vital streetcar system, including a track that ran down its main corridor, Woodward Avenue. In April, some 60 years after the old lines were eradicated to make way for cars, the new QLine will restore streetcar service to downtown over a 3.3-mile route. "You can't underestimate the symbolic importance of unveiling mass transit in a city like Detroit, which was built on cars," said Amy S. Eckert, a freelance writer and the author of "100 Things to Do in Detroit Before You Die." The streetcar, of course, is limited relative to the footprint of Detroit, and taxis or shuttles, including a service called Skoot that offers van transportation for $20 a person, are still the most common way to get downtown from the airport. But the project has sparked a building boom as residences, restaurants and shops have moved in along the corridor. Visitors will be able to shuttle along the route for about $1.50 a ride from near the Detroit River downtown to the nearby baseball and football stadiums (professional hockey and basketball facilities are being built and are expected to open this fall). The route also passes through the cultural Midtown district, home to the Detroit Institute of Arts and other museums. Hotels along the streetcar route include the recently opened Aloft Detroit at the David Whitney. "Come April, I don’t think you’ll miss having a car, provided you stay in and around Woodward Avenue, and that’s where most of the renaissance is anyway," Ms. Eckert said. Some areas worth exploring, like the vibrant Corktown neighborhood or Belle Isle Park, are some distance from the streetcar route. For those, there are Uber, Lyft and, also coming in spring, Detroit Bike Share with 43 stations. Read Full Article @ The New York Times
    Mar 12, 2017 67
  • 08 Mar 2017
    SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    74 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • SEMCOG, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, and its partner organization, the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), have launched a survey to gather residents’ perceptions on pedestrian and bicycle safety in SE Michigan. Citizens can fill out the survey here. Responses will help SEMCOG prioritize and focus education campaigns that will begin to start in May. “With the increased emphasis on biking and walking as a quality-of-life and public health enhancement, it is critical that motorists and nonmotorists understand the rules of the road so that everyone stays safe,” said Kathleen Lomako, SEMCOG Executive Director and MAC President. “This survey will help us target our upcoming public safety campaign.” SEMCOG is the only organization in Southeast Michigan that brings together all local governments to solve regional challenges and enhance the quality of life for residents of Southeast Michigan. Learn about what SEMCOG does here. The Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC), a non-profit public/private partnership, brings business, labor, government and education leaders together to build consensus and seek solutions to regional issues. Learn about what MAC does here.  Source: Sue Stetler @ 313-324-3428 or email
    Mar 08, 2017 74
  • 07 Mar 2017
    A new plan by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy calls for the creation of two new pathways to the river similar to the Dequindre Cut. The project plans to expand the decade long transformation of the riverfront district from an industrial sector to public, recreational-use center, which will spur new people-friendly developments in the district. The framework plan also envisions added preservation of about 8 acres of land for public use, particularly from Atwater Street south to the river, and Stroh River Place and Rivard Plaza; an eastward expansion of the Detroit RiverWalk; safety improvements along East Jefferson Avenue. The Joseph Campau Greenway plans to run from East Vernor Highway south to the river, while the Beltline Greenway, between Belleview and Beaufait streets, runs from Kercheval Street to the river. Mark Wallace, president and CEO of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, said that the construction on the nearly 2-mile Joseph Campau Greenway is expected to begin next year, while the 1.5-mile Beltline Greenway should begin construction toward the end of this year or early into next year. Three sites previously expected to be privately developed are now planned for public use. The property was previously planned as a site for former mayor Dave Bing's  $60 million Watermark residential development. A groundbreaking is expected this year on the promenade linking the Detroit RiverWalk from Mt. Elliott Park to the Douglas MacArthur Bridge running along the Uniroyal Tire Co. site. In addition to the new pathways, things like improved crosswalks and new bike lanes are expected as part of the plan. The overall improvement program is expected to be jointly funded by the conservancy of Detroit and the Economic Development Corp. The total cost of the improvements was not available. Source: Crains Detroit
    144 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • A new plan by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy calls for the creation of two new pathways to the river similar to the Dequindre Cut. The project plans to expand the decade long transformation of the riverfront district from an industrial sector to public, recreational-use center, which will spur new people-friendly developments in the district. The framework plan also envisions added preservation of about 8 acres of land for public use, particularly from Atwater Street south to the river, and Stroh River Place and Rivard Plaza; an eastward expansion of the Detroit RiverWalk; safety improvements along East Jefferson Avenue. The Joseph Campau Greenway plans to run from East Vernor Highway south to the river, while the Beltline Greenway, between Belleview and Beaufait streets, runs from Kercheval Street to the river. Mark Wallace, president and CEO of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, said that the construction on the nearly 2-mile Joseph Campau Greenway is expected to begin next year, while the 1.5-mile Beltline Greenway should begin construction toward the end of this year or early into next year. Three sites previously expected to be privately developed are now planned for public use. The property was previously planned as a site for former mayor Dave Bing's  $60 million Watermark residential development. A groundbreaking is expected this year on the promenade linking the Detroit RiverWalk from Mt. Elliott Park to the Douglas MacArthur Bridge running along the Uniroyal Tire Co. site. In addition to the new pathways, things like improved crosswalks and new bike lanes are expected as part of the plan. The overall improvement program is expected to be jointly funded by the conservancy of Detroit and the Economic Development Corp. The total cost of the improvements was not available. Source: Crains Detroit
    Mar 07, 2017 144
  • 04 Mar 2017
    The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) recently announced that pedestrian foot-paths and protected bike lanes will be included on the Gordie Howe International Bridge. The 12-foot-wide path will be on the east side of the bridge with concrete barriers separating pedestrians and cyclists from motorists, the lanes will accommodate two-way traffic for pedestrians and cyclists, and the routes will connect to local throughfares. "Today's announcement is an example of how WDBA responds to opportunities our communities bring to our attention," said Dwight Duncan, chair of the bridge authority. "We have heard you loud and clear that the ability to cross the Gordie Howe International Bridge by bike or by foot is important to you. They say that a vision needs a plan, otherwise it's a dream and I am pleased to say that dreams do come true. The integration of a multi-use path will benefit the communities, as it will support active transportation, a healthy lifestyle as well as enhance cycle tourism across the border." Canada plans to cover the cost of the $2.1 billion bridge, plus a $250 million customs plaza on the U.S. side. Michigan's share of the cost is to be repaid in the form of toll collections. No word on toll prices or restrictions for cyclists and pedestrians.  (Source MLive.com)
    90 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) recently announced that pedestrian foot-paths and protected bike lanes will be included on the Gordie Howe International Bridge. The 12-foot-wide path will be on the east side of the bridge with concrete barriers separating pedestrians and cyclists from motorists, the lanes will accommodate two-way traffic for pedestrians and cyclists, and the routes will connect to local throughfares. "Today's announcement is an example of how WDBA responds to opportunities our communities bring to our attention," said Dwight Duncan, chair of the bridge authority. "We have heard you loud and clear that the ability to cross the Gordie Howe International Bridge by bike or by foot is important to you. They say that a vision needs a plan, otherwise it's a dream and I am pleased to say that dreams do come true. The integration of a multi-use path will benefit the communities, as it will support active transportation, a healthy lifestyle as well as enhance cycle tourism across the border." Canada plans to cover the cost of the $2.1 billion bridge, plus a $250 million customs plaza on the U.S. side. Michigan's share of the cost is to be repaid in the form of toll collections. No word on toll prices or restrictions for cyclists and pedestrians.  (Source MLive.com)
    Mar 04, 2017 90