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  • 25 Feb 2018
    OAKLAND COUNTY — A bike sharing program could be coming to seven local communities in 2019 or beyond. The cities of Berkley, Royal Oak, Pleasant Ridge, Ferndale, Madison Heights, Huntington Woods and Detroit have been talking about participating in a bike sharing program called MoGo. The program already runs in Detroit. Recently, the Huntington Woods City Commission approved at its Feb. 13 meeting a letter of support for a Transportation Alternatives Program, or TAP, grant application that Ferndale is looking into applying for by the grant’s March 7 deadline. If the grant is awarded, it will be given to the program for a potential 2019 launch. “The City Commission is interested in continuing to study it,” City Manager Amy Sullivan said. “We have not made a decision one way or the other whether it is something that would be needed in Huntington Woods. So we’re just continuing to take a look at the program, take a look at the costs, eventually get feedback from residents on their thoughts on the program, and then a decision will be made.” Sullivan said the two things the city and  the commission want to learn more about are the costs and the interest among residents to have this service available in Huntington Woods. “In other words, the old ‘if you build it, will they come’ philosophy,” she said. “I’m not sure yet whether residents will take advantage of the bike sharing program.” The MoGo program has a person buy a pass online, on an app or at a bike station. A person can then take a bike from a station and return it when the rental time ends. There are three different stations a city can select: a kiosk station that has a payment station, 15 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $34,456; a smart station that has 16 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $27,631; and a satellite station that has a kiosk tech panel, seven docking points and three bikes, which would cost $14,431. The operating costs are a monthly fee of $89 per docking point. Sullivan said the one-time costs of the stations would be offset by the TAP grant, which would cover 70 percent of that total. The city would have to pay the rest or seek funding from another source. “It is the operational cost; the monthly cost that would not be offset by the TAP grant would have to be covered by user fees or sponsorships,” she said. Ferndale has been leading the charge for the program behind the scenes in looking at applying for the grant, though City Planner Justin Lyons said there isn’t much he can share at this point. “Bike sharing’s been a priority for City Council throughout a few plans — a strategic plan, (the) Ferndale Moves! plan,” he said. “We’re always looking at new ways to get people to and from where they want to go. So we’ve started looking at a program, but at this point it’s kind of too early to share much. We’re exploring what it would cost and what grant opportunities there are right now.” If the program goes forward, Lyons believes Ferndale would probably want a bigger station, but he stressed that it’s still too early to tell if anything will happen. He said that the city should know more by the summer, when the grants will be awarded. In terms of asking cities including Huntington Woods to state their interest, Lyons said the Southeast Michigan Council of Goverments, which handles the TAP grant program with the Michigan Department of Transportation, awards points for a variety of reasons, and it is always supportive of regional partnerships.  “Anytime we apply for a TAP grant, like we did for the neighborhood bike route a few years ago with Oak Park for their improvements at Nine Mile last year, we always look to partner, and we’re always interested in partnering with neighboring communities, because really when you talk about bicycling improvements, if you can only bike around one city, it doesn’t really do the network justice. It’s really more of a ‘let’s try and improve the regional network as a whole,’” he said. Source: CandGnews.com/news
    2 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • OAKLAND COUNTY — A bike sharing program could be coming to seven local communities in 2019 or beyond. The cities of Berkley, Royal Oak, Pleasant Ridge, Ferndale, Madison Heights, Huntington Woods and Detroit have been talking about participating in a bike sharing program called MoGo. The program already runs in Detroit. Recently, the Huntington Woods City Commission approved at its Feb. 13 meeting a letter of support for a Transportation Alternatives Program, or TAP, grant application that Ferndale is looking into applying for by the grant’s March 7 deadline. If the grant is awarded, it will be given to the program for a potential 2019 launch. “The City Commission is interested in continuing to study it,” City Manager Amy Sullivan said. “We have not made a decision one way or the other whether it is something that would be needed in Huntington Woods. So we’re just continuing to take a look at the program, take a look at the costs, eventually get feedback from residents on their thoughts on the program, and then a decision will be made.” Sullivan said the two things the city and  the commission want to learn more about are the costs and the interest among residents to have this service available in Huntington Woods. “In other words, the old ‘if you build it, will they come’ philosophy,” she said. “I’m not sure yet whether residents will take advantage of the bike sharing program.” The MoGo program has a person buy a pass online, on an app or at a bike station. A person can then take a bike from a station and return it when the rental time ends. There are three different stations a city can select: a kiosk station that has a payment station, 15 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $34,456; a smart station that has 16 docking points, seven bikes and would cost $27,631; and a satellite station that has a kiosk tech panel, seven docking points and three bikes, which would cost $14,431. The operating costs are a monthly fee of $89 per docking point. Sullivan said the one-time costs of the stations would be offset by the TAP grant, which would cover 70 percent of that total. The city would have to pay the rest or seek funding from another source. “It is the operational cost; the monthly cost that would not be offset by the TAP grant would have to be covered by user fees or sponsorships,” she said. Ferndale has been leading the charge for the program behind the scenes in looking at applying for the grant, though City Planner Justin Lyons said there isn’t much he can share at this point. “Bike sharing’s been a priority for City Council throughout a few plans — a strategic plan, (the) Ferndale Moves! plan,” he said. “We’re always looking at new ways to get people to and from where they want to go. So we’ve started looking at a program, but at this point it’s kind of too early to share much. We’re exploring what it would cost and what grant opportunities there are right now.” If the program goes forward, Lyons believes Ferndale would probably want a bigger station, but he stressed that it’s still too early to tell if anything will happen. He said that the city should know more by the summer, when the grants will be awarded. In terms of asking cities including Huntington Woods to state their interest, Lyons said the Southeast Michigan Council of Goverments, which handles the TAP grant program with the Michigan Department of Transportation, awards points for a variety of reasons, and it is always supportive of regional partnerships.  “Anytime we apply for a TAP grant, like we did for the neighborhood bike route a few years ago with Oak Park for their improvements at Nine Mile last year, we always look to partner, and we’re always interested in partnering with neighboring communities, because really when you talk about bicycling improvements, if you can only bike around one city, it doesn’t really do the network justice. It’s really more of a ‘let’s try and improve the regional network as a whole,’” he said. Source: CandGnews.com/news
    Feb 25, 2018 2
  • 07 Nov 2017
    Downtown Publications ― By the end of 2018, metro Detroit is set to have more dedicated bicycle lanes and paths than New York City, San Francisco or Los Angeles. It will also be home to one of only two permanent indoor cycling velodromes in the country. At the center of the bicycle revolution is Rochester Hills resident Dale Hughes, who has designed and constructed more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the International Velodrome at Bloomer Park in Rochester Hills, as well as the Indoor Multi-Sport facility featuring a world class velodrome at Tolan Playfield in Detroit. Set to open by the end of the year, the $4 million indoor multi-sport facility at Tolan Playfeild is being constructed without tax funds through the non-profit Detroit Fitness Foundation, of which Hughes serves as executive director, and an "angel" donor from metro Detroit. "It will be the second velodrome in Michigan and one of about 25 in the United States," Hughes said. "Most of them are old, going back a good 30 or 40 years." That was until Hughes started designing and building velodromes on a regular basis, beginning with a 250-meter track in Atlanta, Georgia, which was built for the 1996 Olympic Games. Since then, he has built velodromes for the 2002 and 2006 Olympic Games; the 2015 Pam Am Games in Toronto; the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India; and national training facilities in Israel, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan and other countries, as well as tracks in Santa Rosa, Denver, Chicago, Cleveland and other places. Yet for all of his work creating velodromes, Hughes didn't initially get interested in cycling until after graduating from Oakland University with a business degree and deciding to open a local bicycle shop. "I was born in Highland Park, then moved to the farmland of Rochester and went to Rochester High and Oakland University," he said. "I wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I visited my sister in Germany and discovered cycling. I asked my dad to loan me $9,000, which is how much I knew he had, and another friend did the same and we opened a bike shop." A few years later, Hughes met Wolverine Sports Club cycling coach Mike Walden, who had trained Olympic-winning cyclists. Walden suggested Hughes work on building a velodrome. Hughes partnered with a friend and built a portable velodrome as he toured around the country for events. In 1981 the portable track was stolen when someone drove off with the trucks and trailers used to transport the velodrome. "We had it in three trailers and trucks. We thought it was secure, but they drove off with it," Hughes said. "It wasn't insured. We kept looking for six years for boarded up houses with Schwinn logos on it because they were one of the sponsors." (LOL) In 1995 after getting a call from the U.S. Olympic committee to construct a track for the summer games in Atlanta, Dale took up the opportunity and started up again. With his newest endeavor as executive director of the Detroit Fitness Foundation, Hughes hopes to attract international athletes while promoting fitness in the city. Which is good because the new position means less time away from home, building new velodromes, and more time focusing on home. Read full article @ Downtown Publications | Photo by: Jean Lannen
    103 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • Downtown Publications ― By the end of 2018, metro Detroit is set to have more dedicated bicycle lanes and paths than New York City, San Francisco or Los Angeles. It will also be home to one of only two permanent indoor cycling velodromes in the country. At the center of the bicycle revolution is Rochester Hills resident Dale Hughes, who has designed and constructed more than 20 velodromes around the world, including the International Velodrome at Bloomer Park in Rochester Hills, as well as the Indoor Multi-Sport facility featuring a world class velodrome at Tolan Playfield in Detroit. Set to open by the end of the year, the $4 million indoor multi-sport facility at Tolan Playfeild is being constructed without tax funds through the non-profit Detroit Fitness Foundation, of which Hughes serves as executive director, and an "angel" donor from metro Detroit. "It will be the second velodrome in Michigan and one of about 25 in the United States," Hughes said. "Most of them are old, going back a good 30 or 40 years." That was until Hughes started designing and building velodromes on a regular basis, beginning with a 250-meter track in Atlanta, Georgia, which was built for the 1996 Olympic Games. Since then, he has built velodromes for the 2002 and 2006 Olympic Games; the 2015 Pam Am Games in Toronto; the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India; and national training facilities in Israel, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan and other countries, as well as tracks in Santa Rosa, Denver, Chicago, Cleveland and other places. Yet for all of his work creating velodromes, Hughes didn't initially get interested in cycling until after graduating from Oakland University with a business degree and deciding to open a local bicycle shop. "I was born in Highland Park, then moved to the farmland of Rochester and went to Rochester High and Oakland University," he said. "I wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I visited my sister in Germany and discovered cycling. I asked my dad to loan me $9,000, which is how much I knew he had, and another friend did the same and we opened a bike shop." A few years later, Hughes met Wolverine Sports Club cycling coach Mike Walden, who had trained Olympic-winning cyclists. Walden suggested Hughes work on building a velodrome. Hughes partnered with a friend and built a portable velodrome as he toured around the country for events. In 1981 the portable track was stolen when someone drove off with the trucks and trailers used to transport the velodrome. "We had it in three trailers and trucks. We thought it was secure, but they drove off with it," Hughes said. "It wasn't insured. We kept looking for six years for boarded up houses with Schwinn logos on it because they were one of the sponsors." (LOL) In 1995 after getting a call from the U.S. Olympic committee to construct a track for the summer games in Atlanta, Dale took up the opportunity and started up again. With his newest endeavor as executive director of the Detroit Fitness Foundation, Hughes hopes to attract international athletes while promoting fitness in the city. Which is good because the new position means less time away from home, building new velodromes, and more time focusing on home. Read full article @ Downtown Publications | Photo by: Jean Lannen
    Nov 07, 2017 103
  • 29 Oct 2017
    curbed.com — The Inner Circle Greenway has been in the works for years, and now, as the 26-mile non-motorized trail gets closer to reality, it has a new name. The trail will be named after Detroit boxing legend Joe Louis. This comes as we inch closer to the demolition of the Joe Louis Arena along the Riverfront. Planning, design, and construction of the trail will all be happening in the next few years. Courtesy of the City of Detroit & curbed.com The trail will connect many neighborhoods and communities in the city, from the East Riverfront up through Hamtramck, over to the University District, Ferndale, and Highland Park, and back down to Southwest Detroit. The planning of the trail has been a collaboration between the city, Detroit Greenways Coalition, the Kresge Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan. A request for proposals for framework consultants will be released in early 2018. According to a city press release, “The Framework Plan will include recommendations for land use and zoning, green infrastructure, connections to public assets such as parks, wayfinding, and thoughtful intersection with local and regional multimodal transportation routes such as the Iron Belle Trail, SMART bus network, and the new Gordie Howe Bridge.” The process will include community engagement throughout. Plans to honor Joe Louis could include murals and art installations along the route.
    88 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • curbed.com — The Inner Circle Greenway has been in the works for years, and now, as the 26-mile non-motorized trail gets closer to reality, it has a new name. The trail will be named after Detroit boxing legend Joe Louis. This comes as we inch closer to the demolition of the Joe Louis Arena along the Riverfront. Planning, design, and construction of the trail will all be happening in the next few years. Courtesy of the City of Detroit & curbed.com The trail will connect many neighborhoods and communities in the city, from the East Riverfront up through Hamtramck, over to the University District, Ferndale, and Highland Park, and back down to Southwest Detroit. The planning of the trail has been a collaboration between the city, Detroit Greenways Coalition, the Kresge Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Southeast Michigan. A request for proposals for framework consultants will be released in early 2018. According to a city press release, “The Framework Plan will include recommendations for land use and zoning, green infrastructure, connections to public assets such as parks, wayfinding, and thoughtful intersection with local and regional multimodal transportation routes such as the Iron Belle Trail, SMART bus network, and the new Gordie Howe Bridge.” The process will include community engagement throughout. Plans to honor Joe Louis could include murals and art installations along the route.
    Oct 29, 2017 88
  • 11 Oct 2017
    circa.com, Natalia Angulo-Hinkson — Cycling is seeing a renaissance in the U.S. There are 60 million recreational cyclists in the country who have helped lift the bike industry to be worth $6.2 billion, according the National Bicycle Dealers Association (NBDA). With more people purchasing bikes and ridership seeing an increase, American bicycle brands are also beginning to see a resurgence after decades of offshoring. Zak Pashak’s bicycle manufacturing startup, Detroit Bikes, is one of those brands. The four-year-old company is not only helping give the Motor City a new identity, it aims to make the car capital easier to navigate.  "We make our bikes for city use primarily, so we're trying to help develop an alternative form of transport," Pashak, who is president of Detroit Bikes and invested $2.5 million to get the project off the ground, told Circa. "We're trying to help develop an alternative form of transport." Bringing back bike manufacturing Currently, the majority (nearly 99 percent) of bikes sold in the U.S. are imported from China and Taiwan, according the U.S. Department of Commerce. In 1990, the U.S. was producing 5.6 million units, according to data from the International Bicycle Fund. Fast forward 25 years and that number had sunk to 200,000, but the American-made bike market is staging a comeback. According to NBDA, "There are dozens of smaller U.S. bike makers — over 100 brands in all, so there is domestic manufacturing at some level." Detroit Bikes locally sources many of the materials it uses to cut, weld, paint and assemble its bikes, such as American chromoly steel (the kind used in race cars, which is durable and super light weight). The company hand builds its line of bikes out of a refurbished 50,000 square foot space in the city. Since it launched in 2013, the manufacturing startup has sold 10,000 bikes, with bulk orders making up a good chunk of their sales. The company's goal is to produce 50,000 bikes a year, which would double the country's output of bikes. From Motor City to Bike City Pashak's interest in bikes really started when he ran for city council in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. After getting involved in transportation policy, he decided he wanted to help give urban dwellers across North America a viable and more affordable alternative to cars for getting around. He packed up and moved to the Motor City. "I had a sense that customers were becoming more and more interested in where their products were coming from," he said. "I thought maybe there was a chance that we could get especially American customers interested in cycling again by giving them a product that they really identified with." "I had a sense that customers were becoming more and more interested in where their products were coming from," he said. "I thought maybe there was a chance that we could get especially American customers interested in cycling again by giving them a product that they really identified with." Automaker bankruptcies dealt the Motor City a hard blow that led to layoffs and economic hardships. But out of the rubble, entrepreneurs have found vacant spaces and skilled workers looking for a second chance. Locals will tell you the Midwest city is having a moment – Detroit Bikes is part of that. "Detroit is a manufacturing place. If these are going to be Detroit bikes, I think a really important part of that is that they're made here by people here," Pashak said. Henry Ford II is the head of assembly at Detroit Bikes. He has deep roots in the Motor City and his family is known around town as the "other Ford family" because at one point, at least 10 members of his family worked for the iconic car maker, he told to Circa. "Long story short, my grandfather from Mississippi came up to Detroit in the ‘20s when Ford Motors did the $5 day promotion," he explained. "To be part of the revival of what put Detroit on the map is really something that I’m proud of." A former banking professional, he lost his job after the 2008 Recession. For years after that, he gave bike tours to tourists and locals, which is how Ford found his way to Detroit Bikes. "If you wanted to and you had the time and energy, you could ride a group ride on your bike every day of the week," Ford said. Although bike commuting has grown in popularity in the U.S., compared to other developed countries, it still lags behind. The biggest reason for this discrepancy is the lack of bike lanes. Detroit may not fall in the top 10 American cities with bike lanes, in the last decade it has paved over 100 miles of cycling infrastructure. "For years, we were known as the Motor City," Ford said. "With the resurgence of biking that's really exploded around Detroit, that name is transitioning to Bike City." American made products Surveys say American shoppers want products made in the U.S., but when it comes down to it, consumers really want a good deal. A recent Reuters-Ipsos poll cited by the Washington Post found that 69 percent of people indicated price was "very important" when making a purchase, compared to half that number (32 percent) who said it was "very important" for a product to be made in America. The same Washington Post article cites a separate Associated Press-GFK survey that revealed another problem for the Made in America movement is that Americans might say they prefer to buy domestic products, but a scant 30 percent are actually willing to pay more for them. Pashak argues that lack of understanding around what it really takes to make something, in this case bikes, from start to finish, is part of the issue. "There's some confusion out there about what manufacturing is," he said. "But the most concise way I know how to do it is that you need to take a raw material and you need to transform that into a finished commercial product." Detroit Bikes manufactures its bike frames in house, but other parts like tires and baskets they assemble. He also believes that just because a product is made in China, or the U.S. for the sake of argument, makes it inherently better. "It's one thing to buy [something] just because it's made in the U.S. Then there's the next level of what about being made in the U.S. makes it a product you want?" he said. This situation, however, does present a pricing problem for specialty bike makers such as Detroit Bikes that retail their products at $750 on average. For comparison, big box sellers offer bikes from overseas that average $90 a pop, according to research from NBDA. So how do you justify the specialty price point to riders? "For us, the manufacturing side is really important as part of our story. We're in Detroit. We're selling Detroit Bikes. That's our challenge – to find that connection for the different customers," Pashak said. Visit the source article @ Circa.com
    131 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • circa.com, Natalia Angulo-Hinkson — Cycling is seeing a renaissance in the U.S. There are 60 million recreational cyclists in the country who have helped lift the bike industry to be worth $6.2 billion, according the National Bicycle Dealers Association (NBDA). With more people purchasing bikes and ridership seeing an increase, American bicycle brands are also beginning to see a resurgence after decades of offshoring. Zak Pashak’s bicycle manufacturing startup, Detroit Bikes, is one of those brands. The four-year-old company is not only helping give the Motor City a new identity, it aims to make the car capital easier to navigate.  "We make our bikes for city use primarily, so we're trying to help develop an alternative form of transport," Pashak, who is president of Detroit Bikes and invested $2.5 million to get the project off the ground, told Circa. "We're trying to help develop an alternative form of transport." Bringing back bike manufacturing Currently, the majority (nearly 99 percent) of bikes sold in the U.S. are imported from China and Taiwan, according the U.S. Department of Commerce. In 1990, the U.S. was producing 5.6 million units, according to data from the International Bicycle Fund. Fast forward 25 years and that number had sunk to 200,000, but the American-made bike market is staging a comeback. According to NBDA, "There are dozens of smaller U.S. bike makers — over 100 brands in all, so there is domestic manufacturing at some level." Detroit Bikes locally sources many of the materials it uses to cut, weld, paint and assemble its bikes, such as American chromoly steel (the kind used in race cars, which is durable and super light weight). The company hand builds its line of bikes out of a refurbished 50,000 square foot space in the city. Since it launched in 2013, the manufacturing startup has sold 10,000 bikes, with bulk orders making up a good chunk of their sales. The company's goal is to produce 50,000 bikes a year, which would double the country's output of bikes. From Motor City to Bike City Pashak's interest in bikes really started when he ran for city council in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. After getting involved in transportation policy, he decided he wanted to help give urban dwellers across North America a viable and more affordable alternative to cars for getting around. He packed up and moved to the Motor City. "I had a sense that customers were becoming more and more interested in where their products were coming from," he said. "I thought maybe there was a chance that we could get especially American customers interested in cycling again by giving them a product that they really identified with." "I had a sense that customers were becoming more and more interested in where their products were coming from," he said. "I thought maybe there was a chance that we could get especially American customers interested in cycling again by giving them a product that they really identified with." Automaker bankruptcies dealt the Motor City a hard blow that led to layoffs and economic hardships. But out of the rubble, entrepreneurs have found vacant spaces and skilled workers looking for a second chance. Locals will tell you the Midwest city is having a moment – Detroit Bikes is part of that. "Detroit is a manufacturing place. If these are going to be Detroit bikes, I think a really important part of that is that they're made here by people here," Pashak said. Henry Ford II is the head of assembly at Detroit Bikes. He has deep roots in the Motor City and his family is known around town as the "other Ford family" because at one point, at least 10 members of his family worked for the iconic car maker, he told to Circa. "Long story short, my grandfather from Mississippi came up to Detroit in the ‘20s when Ford Motors did the $5 day promotion," he explained. "To be part of the revival of what put Detroit on the map is really something that I’m proud of." A former banking professional, he lost his job after the 2008 Recession. For years after that, he gave bike tours to tourists and locals, which is how Ford found his way to Detroit Bikes. "If you wanted to and you had the time and energy, you could ride a group ride on your bike every day of the week," Ford said. Although bike commuting has grown in popularity in the U.S., compared to other developed countries, it still lags behind. The biggest reason for this discrepancy is the lack of bike lanes. Detroit may not fall in the top 10 American cities with bike lanes, in the last decade it has paved over 100 miles of cycling infrastructure. "For years, we were known as the Motor City," Ford said. "With the resurgence of biking that's really exploded around Detroit, that name is transitioning to Bike City." American made products Surveys say American shoppers want products made in the U.S., but when it comes down to it, consumers really want a good deal. A recent Reuters-Ipsos poll cited by the Washington Post found that 69 percent of people indicated price was "very important" when making a purchase, compared to half that number (32 percent) who said it was "very important" for a product to be made in America. The same Washington Post article cites a separate Associated Press-GFK survey that revealed another problem for the Made in America movement is that Americans might say they prefer to buy domestic products, but a scant 30 percent are actually willing to pay more for them. Pashak argues that lack of understanding around what it really takes to make something, in this case bikes, from start to finish, is part of the issue. "There's some confusion out there about what manufacturing is," he said. "But the most concise way I know how to do it is that you need to take a raw material and you need to transform that into a finished commercial product." Detroit Bikes manufactures its bike frames in house, but other parts like tires and baskets they assemble. He also believes that just because a product is made in China, or the U.S. for the sake of argument, makes it inherently better. "It's one thing to buy [something] just because it's made in the U.S. Then there's the next level of what about being made in the U.S. makes it a product you want?" he said. This situation, however, does present a pricing problem for specialty bike makers such as Detroit Bikes that retail their products at $750 on average. For comparison, big box sellers offer bikes from overseas that average $90 a pop, according to research from NBDA. So how do you justify the specialty price point to riders? "For us, the manufacturing side is really important as part of our story. We're in Detroit. We're selling Detroit Bikes. That's our challenge – to find that connection for the different customers," Pashak said. Visit the source article @ Circa.com
    Oct 11, 2017 131
  • 11 Oct 2017
    StreetFilms.org, Clarence Eckerson Jr. ― More than 300 volunteers organized by Transportation Alternatives formed a six-block-long “human-protected bike lane” on Fifth Avenue last night, calling on the de Blasio administration to extend the protected bike lane network through Midtown’s busiest streets. Fifth Avenue has no bike infrastructure above 26th Street, leaving a large void in the bicycle network where there’s huge travel demand. Protected bike lanes can’t come soon enough: Through the first eight months of this year drivers injured 15 people biking and 28 people walking on Fifth Avenue in Midtown, according to city data. Last month, DOT presented a plan to add a second bus lane on this part of Fifth Avenue, but a bikeway was not included. To date, the agency has hesitated to claim street space for biking and walking on these busy Midtown avenues. DOT has stated a vague intention to extend protected bike lanes through the busiest blocks of Fifth and Sixth Avenues but never backed that up with specific commitments, timetables, or designs. The hundreds of people taking action yesterday were saying that’s not good enough and took matters into their own hands. The human-protected bike lane occupied two lanes, from 50th Street to 44th Street. Fifth Avenue functioned perfectly well while the impromptu bike lane was in effect. People biking quickly gravitated to the new space set aside for them, while car and bus traffic continued apace in the remaining three lanes. In a written response posted on DOT’s Twitter feed, Commissioner Polly Trottenberg framed the campaign for a bike lane as being in conflict with the second bus lane for Fifth Avenue. “We did not want to postpone what we see as a reasonably straightforward improvement for buses,” she wrote.
    83 Posted by Aaron Lad
  • StreetFilms.org, Clarence Eckerson Jr. ― More than 300 volunteers organized by Transportation Alternatives formed a six-block-long “human-protected bike lane” on Fifth Avenue last night, calling on the de Blasio administration to extend the protected bike lane network through Midtown’s busiest streets. Fifth Avenue has no bike infrastructure above 26th Street, leaving a large void in the bicycle network where there’s huge travel demand. Protected bike lanes can’t come soon enough: Through the first eight months of this year drivers injured 15 people biking and 28 people walking on Fifth Avenue in Midtown, according to city data. Last month, DOT presented a plan to add a second bus lane on this part of Fifth Avenue, but a bikeway was not included. To date, the agency has hesitated to claim street space for biking and walking on these busy Midtown avenues. DOT has stated a vague intention to extend protected bike lanes through the busiest blocks of Fifth and Sixth Avenues but never backed that up with specific commitments, timetables, or designs. The hundreds of people taking action yesterday were saying that’s not good enough and took matters into their own hands. The human-protected bike lane occupied two lanes, from 50th Street to 44th Street. Fifth Avenue functioned perfectly well while the impromptu bike lane was in effect. People biking quickly gravitated to the new space set aside for them, while car and bus traffic continued apace in the remaining three lanes. In a written response posted on DOT’s Twitter feed, Commissioner Polly Trottenberg framed the campaign for a bike lane as being in conflict with the second bus lane for Fifth Avenue. “We did not want to postpone what we see as a reasonably straightforward improvement for buses,” she wrote.
    Oct 11, 2017 83

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  • Slow Roll Detroit @ Eastern Market
    by Systems Admin 129 0 0
    Slow Roll Detroit May 1st 2017 season opener. Each ride is different, but the outcome is always the same: HAPPY PEOPLE. Come Ride Slow Roll Detroit. Thumbnail photo: credit goes to James Brown @ Free Face Lifestyle & Fitness.
    129 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Mad Anthony: filmed & edited by Matt Dughi
    by Systems Admin 142 0 0
    The Mad Anthony Cyclocross race is the only USA Cycling sanctioned bicycle race held in the City of Detroit. The race takes place at historic Fort Wayne in downtown Detroit. See the event website for more info: MadAnthonyCX.org
    142 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Detroit Criterium, filmed & edited by Matt Dughi
    by Aaron Lad 114 0 0
    Roads were prepped in the early morning hours for what was to be an awesome day of road racing that Detroit won’t soon forget. The amateurs began the day at 8am. The start finish line was set in front of the YMCA. Detroit hadn't seen a Critium Race in over 20 years.
    114 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Tyler Fernengel BMX Session: Silverdome
    by Systems Admin 121 0 0
    Tyler Fernengel sessions the abandoned Silverdome in Pontiac. Fernengel, a native of Wyandotte, raced Supercross at the Silverdome as a young boy. At 16, Fernengel turned pro after releasing several web edits detailing his remarkable skills as a street style BMX competitor. CLICK for the full story behind his session: http://win.gs/TylerFernegelFullStory
    121 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Henry Ford II & Detroit Bikes: Giving People Tools to Move
    by Systems Admin 142 0 0
    Detroit native Henry Ford II is the master builder at Detroit Bikes, and he is on a mission to give people the tools they need to move. After the economy crashed in 2008, Henry was out of a job and looking for a new purpose. While cycling around his neighborhood, he felt the positive effects of exercise and fresh air, and wanted to spread that to others. Learn more about Henry’s story and Detroit Bikes @ http://news.microsoft.com/features
    142 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • New Velodrome Announcement @ Tolan Field
    by Systems Admin 130 0 0
    The Detroit Fitness Foundation has announced their plans to build a $4 million multi-sport complex and a world class cyclist training velodrome. Dale Hughes said the Construction on the facility at Detroit's Tolan Playfield will begin this spring and completion is expected by late summer. The facility was funded by The Detroit Fitness Foundation, a nonprofit organization.
    130 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • X Games Detroit TRAILER
    by Aaron Lad 153 0 0
    Detroit is bidding on the 2014-2016 X Games. Everyone wants to know why Detroit should host the X Games. Why tell you when we can show you. Share this video with @xgames using #xg2d, and join the movement at www.facebook.com/xgamesdetroit Cinematography, Editorial, & Post: www.theworkinc.com Composer: David Payne
    153 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • DOWNTOWN FERNDALE BIKE SHOP @ THEPADDLE.TV
    by Systems Admin 195 0 0
    THEPADDLE.TV Interviews Jon Hughes of the Downtown Ferndale Bike Shop. The Downtown Ferndale Bike Shop opened in 2009. The shop is staffed with a wide variety of biking personalities from professional race-day warriors, to commuters, to fixed-gear bmx riders, to hard-core bike polo enthusiasts.
    195 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Slow Roll - Extraordinary Event
    by Systems Admin 147 0 0
    Five years ago, the Slow Roll group bicycle ride was founded to bring together riders of all different ages and skill levels. Today, Slow Roll is the second largest weekly bike ride in the U.S., with over 3,000 bicyclists each Monday. Praised for its diversity, Slow Roll encourages participation among all groups regardless of ability or age. Additionally, this weekly event has inspired the city of Detroit to invest in safer bicycle infrastructure due to its extreme popularity. Slow Roll has teamed with various other community organizations to give back to Detroit, demonstrating its commitment to the betterment of the city and its residents.
    147 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • Maurice Cox, Director of Planning and Development
    by Systems Admin 147 0 0
    The City of Detroit Director of Planning and Development Maurice Cox talks about bike lanes for the city and shows us his morning commute.
    147 views 0 likes 0 comments
  • It's simple. It's a local online bulletin board system for Southeast Michigan biking.
    DetroitBikeCity.com is a platform for local cyclists to work together in one social media apparatus. The site can be used as a word-press or a tumblr, or a youtube for bike stuff. Members earn valuable points when people share their media. The site can also be used as an advertising platform for individuals & businesses. The site has an advaced groups feature and a dedicated media center. Through collaboration, quality check inspection & real world results members cooperatively reshape the city.
    The philosophy is that each individual has a "Right To The City" and given the right tool, each individual can reshape and redefine their destiny, their neighborhood and maybe even the entire world.
    Local content. Local culture. Local Results!
    The site is setup like a local open source cycling encyclopedia. The content is crowd sourced and always changing. Members are able to post events, group rides, news stories, merchandise, coupons and more!

    Find Local Groups
    The site is a comprehensive online social media solution for biking clubs.

    Browse Directory
    Businesses and infomation directory helps individuals find cool biking resources & products.

    Create Events
    Members can create and manage advanced events schedules, sponsors & more!

    Like biking itself the site is a work-in-progress, but you too can tandem in the effort! Apply in Recruiting.